NEW! Faster Search Option

Loading

Riddle me this - a chisel Push/pull problems

bones's picture

Ok Dave, while sharpening my sketcup skils (pardon the pun) I wanted to replicate a mortise chisel.   I can create either a chisel end with no wall thickness or a non solid version in places the arches are causing me havoc with the push/pull tool.   Can you assist how would I create this.  I attached my drawing in scene 1 and scene 2.    Any help with arches would be appreciated

 

Well, I was going to upload the skp file but it will not allow.  (hey editors since this is a forum catagory on sketchup don't ya think allowing a file with a scketup file format would be ok) Dave I'll email you the skp file.  

...For that old machine lovers:  http://vintagemachinery.org/home.aspx

bones's picture

sorry that chisel is a hollow mortise chisel (post #169926, reply #1 of 9)

Sorry I should have stated that it's a hollow chisel mortise chisel.  

...For that old machine lovers:  http://vintagemachinery.org/home.aspx

DaveRichards's picture

I got your e-mail and I'll (post #169926, reply #2 of 9)

I got your e-mail and I'll get you an answer ASAP.

 

Dave

DaveRichards's picture

  I don't know if I got the (post #169926, reply #3 of 9)

 

I don't know if I got the right angle but here's the idea I described. I had a Google search for sharpening these things and found someone using a simple cone shaped grinding stone so that's what I drew.
 
One thing you'll  want to do at some point is scale the model up dramatically before running the required intersect operation. I measured the width of the chisel with the Tape Measure tool and got 1/2 in. I typed 500 and let SketchUp resize the model so the chisel was 500 inches across. After I completed the chisel I scaled back down using the same method.
 
So from left to right:
 
  1. Unsharpened chisel stock and above it a triangle and circle from which the cone will be made with Follow Me.
  2. Cone made with Follow Me.
  3. Cone moved down into the chisel.
  4. Chisel and cone selected, right click, choose Intersect Faces>With Selected.
  5. Delete the waste and correct face orientation as needed.
PreviewAttachmentSize
chisel_riddle_solution.png
chisel_riddle_solution.png59.09 KB
RalphBarker's picture

The cone (post #169926, reply #6 of 9)

The result looks pretty sharp. What grit is your SketchUp sharpening cone, Dave?  ;-)

DaveRichards's picture

Hi Ralph, that was actually a (post #169926, reply #7 of 9)

Hi Ralph, that was actually a rather coarse one but I can make them as fine as you'd like. ;)

Hope you are doing well.

Dave

RalphBarker's picture

Coarse and fine grits in SketchUp (post #169926, reply #8 of 9)

"I can make them as fine as you'd like."

I was confident you could, Dave. ;-)

Thanks for the well wishes.

DaveRichards's picture

I should add that you can get (post #169926, reply #4 of 9)

I should add that you can get some interesting effects by simply changing the shape of the cone. You might want to play with a variety of cutter shapes to see what gives you the best appearance.

bones's picture

thanks for the help (post #169926, reply #5 of 9)

Thanks for the help.  It is so simple when you see it in a picture.  The concept of the intersection to create the geometry you want is a eurika (pardon the sp) moment for me and I'll remember that going forward.  Thanks again for the quick response.  U DA MAN! 

...For that old machine lovers:  http://vintagemachinery.org/home.aspx

DaveRichards's picture

Hi Bones, I'm glad that (post #169926, reply #9 of 9)

Hi Bones,

I'm glad that worked out for you. Often it is easier to draw the shape of the cutter or the volume of space it occupies during the cut than it is to draw the cut itself.  You can see a similar thing in the bolg post I did on Stopped Curved Chamfers. I used the same idea for a lot of more complex shapes when I am drawing.