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FWW 209 chop saw stand sketchup plans?

BillA's picture

Is anyone aware of the existence of a sketchup plan for the John White's folding chop saw stand from FWW 209 (2009)? I am building it and there are a few dimensions missing.

DaveRichards's picture

I don't know of one but I (post #170283, reply #1 of 4)

I don't know of one but I expect it could be done easily enough. What dimensions are you missing?

 

Edit: Well, there's part of one now. I haven't finished detailing it but I haven't found any missing dimensions, either.

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BillA's picture

Chopsaw stand measurements (post #170283, reply #2 of 4)

MIssing dimensioins as I see it:

1. Corner trim of base top

2. Corner trim of side table tops. It looks like the corner trim of the front corner nearest the chop saw is different from the others.

3. Location of the 3x1 gusset stop along the support block (see page 56). It does not look like the gusset stop is centered under the support block.

4. I also noticed that the figure on page 57 infers that the hinges that attach the side tables to the base top are attached to the underside of the base top. But if you look at the figure on page 56 is shows that basicaly there is no way the hinge can clear the end piece and have enough length to attach to the underside of the base top. I bought the hinges that are called out in the article and this is indeed true. Either longer hinges are needed or they should be screwed to the top of the base top. I will probably do the latter, because I already have the hinges, and they won't show much if at all

5. I could not find in the article what length hanger bolts to use

 

Thanks for whatever info you can figure out

DaveRichards's picture

  1. Corner trim of base (post #170283, reply #3 of 4)

 

1. Corner trim of base top

Are you talking about lopping off the conrers? I don't think there's anything critical about that. I drew them at 1" but you could put a radius on the corners instead. In the photos on page 55, it looks like it might be closer to 1/2 in. because the face on the corner looks nearly square. Just make it so the corners won't puncture you if you bang into them.

2. Corner trim of side table tops. It looks like the corner trim of the front corner nearest the chop saw is different from the others.

It does look like that corner is cut off more than the others. I'll bet it was done to create clearance for the saw when cutting miters. I'd wait to trim that corner until after the stand is assembled and how much you need to trim off.

3. Location of the 3x1 gusset stop along the support block (see page 56). It does not look like the gusset stop is centered under the support block.

Wait to install the gusset stop until after you've mounted the side tables. Notice also the position of the support blocks isn't specified. Mount the table frame without the support block. Swing the support gusset out where you want it and install the support block so it is over the lag screw. Then install the gusset stop up against the head of the lag screw so that when the support gusset is swung open, it can't go too far. 

4. I also noticed that the figure on page 57 infers that the hinges that attach the side tables to the base top are attached to the underside of the base top. But if you look at the figure on page 56 is shows that basicaly there is no way the hinge can clear the end piece and have enough length to attach to the underside of the base top. I bought the hinges that are called out in the article and this is indeed true. Either longer hinges are needed or they should be screwed to the top of the base top. I will probably do the latter, because I already have the hinges, and they won't show much if at all

If you look at the exploded view of the side table on page 56, you'll see the intention is that the hinges attach to the edge of the top. This will allow the side table to effective lit on top of the base top with no load on the hinges or screws when the side table is in the working position.

5. I could not find in the article what length hanger bolts to use

It depends upon the knobs you have. I would figure about 2 in. or so for the side table top, screw block and fence plus enough for the flatwasher and knob. I think 3 in. would be just fine.

This is the sort of project that doesn't need a lot of hard and fast details. Some of it will depend on the saw you have and the space you have to devote to it in your shop. It's designed to be readily modified so you kind of have to work some of these things out as you go along.

BillA's picture

stand measurements (post #170283, reply #4 of 4)

1. Corner trim of base top

Are you talking about lopping off the conrers? I don't think there's anything critical about that. I drew them at 1" but you could put a radius on the corners instead. In the photos on page 55, it looks like it might be closer to 1/2 in. because the face on the corner looks nearly square. Just make it so the corners won't puncture you if you bang into them.

Yep, talking about lopping off the corners. I agree that dimensions aren't super critical, but was thinking there might be some aesthetic rule-of-thumb. I went ahead and used 3/4", and it seems to look ok.

2. Corner trim of side table tops. It looks like the corner trim of the front corner nearest the chop saw is different from the others.

It does look like that corner is cut off more than the others. I'll bet it was done to create clearance for the saw when cutting miters. I'd wait to trim that corner until after the stand is assembled and how much you need to trim off.

Good idea. I will assemble and check the clearance. thanks

3. Location of the 3x1 gusset stop along the support block (see page 56). It does not look like the gusset stop is centered under the support block.

Wait to install the gusset stop until after you've mounted the side tables. Notice also the position of the support blocks isn't specified. Mount the table frame without the support block. Swing the support gusset out where you want it and install the support block so it is over the lag screw. Then install the gusset stop up against the head of the lag screw so that when the support gusset is swung open, it can't go too far.

good idea on waiting to install the stop until after assembly. But it is a little harder to do. I already installed the support block per the drawing, so will have to live with that. I guess as an engineer my expectation is that if you are going to take the trouble to provide a dimensional drawing, then it should be complete. Character flaw on my part, I suppose.<g>

4. I also noticed that the figure on page 57 infers that the hinges that attach the side tables to the base top are attached to the underside of the base top. But if you look at the figure on page 56 is shows that basicaly there is no way the hinge can clear the end piece and have enough length to attach to the underside of the base top. I bought the hinges that are called out in the article and this is indeed true. Either longer hinges are needed or they should be screwed to the top of the base top. I will probably do the latter, because I already have the hinges, and they won't show much if at all

If you look at the exploded view of the side table on page 56, you'll see the intention is that the hinges attach to the edge of the top. This will allow the side table to effective lit on top of the base top with no load on the hinges or screws when the side table is in the working position.

It never occured to me to attach the hinges at the edge. Basic structural philosophy tells you that is a really bad idea - going interlaminar like that. I think I will attach to the top of the base top.

5. I could not find in the article what length hanger bolts to use

It depends upon the knobs you have. I would figure about 2 in. or so for the side table top, screw block and fence plus enough for the flatwasher and knob. I think 3 in. would be just fine.

This is the sort of project that doesn't need a lot of hard and fast details. Some of it will depend on the saw you have and the space you have to devote to it in your shop. It's designed to be readily modified so you kind of have to work some of these things out as you go along.

Lucklily my saw is the same Bosch used for the article. thanks for the response