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Gluing cast acrylic (plexiglass) to wood

Rooms's picture

Does anyone know of a adhesive to glue cast acrylic (Plexiglass) to wood?


Cast acrylic adhesives such as Weld-on #3, soften or melt the acrylic and then the solvents evaporates to "cure" the pieces together, but they won't adhere to wood.


I've tried polyurethane glue (Gorilla glue) but it won't adhere to cast acrylic.


Thanks for you help.


Rooms

colebearanimals's picture

(post #113555, reply #1 of 7)

Try a 2 part epoxy.


                         Paul

citrouille's picture

(post #113555, reply #2 of 7)

3M makes an adhesive called 5200, it's a caulking like adhesive that was originally designed to replace rivets in the aeronautic industry, I think that's your best bet.

C.

MapleDave's picture

(post #113555, reply #3 of 7)

Rooms,


I found that CA Glue (cyanoacrylate ) works for this application. I made a few shoji type window screens a few years ago that had strips of wood glued to a translucent acrylic panel to form a grid pattern. I tried every glue I could before I found that the CA Glue worked really well. Use the thicker version and avoid any squeeze out because it can't be cleaned off.


Good Luck,  David


  


 

cadiddlehopper's picture

(post #113555, reply #4 of 7)

RTV silicone rubber adhesive should work as should a construction adhesive. I'm surprised that polyurethane does not. A more thorough description of the particular joint would help. Scuffing the acrylic will assist adhesion of most any adhesive. Appearance could be a factor, however. Another issue is wood expansion/contraction vs. that of acrylic. A thick bead of RTV could help with that factor. So could oversized holes, washers, and screws.


Cadiddlehopper

joinerswork's picture

(post #113555, reply #5 of 7)

Rooms,


Be aware that plexi moves rather significantly in reaction to changes in temperature, and that wood moves similarly, but in reaction to changes in humidity.  Not sure what you are doing here, but tying these two media together in large enough pieces, could, on a scale of one-to-bad, end up bad.  Fore-warned, is fore-armed.


Ray

flipstuff's picture

(post #113555, reply #6 of 7)

this site has information about gluing varous kinds of materials together. links to technical info etc.

http://www.thistothat.com/

Rooms's picture

(post #113555, reply #7 of 7)

Thanks to all for your replies.


I can see that I've got a few tests to do.


Rooms