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Jointer Blade Change Problem

CPR's picture

I am the proud "new" owner of an old Craftsman 6" Jointer (Model No. 113.20621)  Got it for nothing.  I figured I would tune it up a bit prior to using.  BTW I am VERY new to all of this.  I bought replacement blades and tried to follow the manual's directions for removing the old blades.  I had to loosen the wedge screws and " tap the end of the wedge with a piece of steel or brass rod..."  I don't think the blades were removed for at least 10 years and they won't budge.  Any suggestions?  Before spraying WD-40 all over the cutter assembly I figured I would check with those who know what they're doing.  Thanks in advance...


CPR 

jeff100's picture

(post #93459, reply #1 of 13)

I also just acquired a Craftsman 6" jointer model 113.206931.  It was a friend of mine's father's, who passed away a couple of years ago.  Brought it home tonight.  After scrubbing the rust off the beds, I pulled the knives out of the cutter head.  They had not been changed in a long time either.  After loosening the wedges, I tried tapping them loose with a wood dowel, but they wouldn't budge.  So I used an allen wrench and after loosening the wedge screws a LOT, I carefully screwed the knife height adjustment set screw out, pushing the knife loose in the process.  Didn't take much so I don't think it hurt anything loosening up the knives this way.  All three came right out.  I don't have a manual so I don't know if this is the way the manual describes removing the knives.  Now to find replacement knives locally...and hopefully a knife sharpening service...


Anyone have suggestions on resharpening planer knives?  I don't have a machine and hand sharpening doesn't seem like a reasonable possibility.


Jeff

CPR's picture

(post #93459, reply #5 of 13)

I found replacement knives ( I think, I'll have to compare them if I ever get the old ones out) at my local Sears.  They look like they are right.  Also try Sears.com and look for replacement parts.  I need a replacement spring for the cutter guard and I found it available online. 

jeff100's picture

(post #93459, reply #6 of 13)

The manual I found (Sear's manual) says to pry the wedges out with a small screwdriver place under the end of the wedge.  Since it is a wedge, once is starts to loosen, it'll fall right out.  Mine did.  I found knives several places, standard knives will work as long as they are 1/8" thick, the right length 6"- 6 1/8" long and between 5/8" minimum and 7/8" maximum width....


Jeff

PeteBradley's picture

(post #93459, reply #10 of 13)

I'm sure the Sears knives are terrible quality. Unless they're a really weird size, good quality replacement knives should be available from a company like Charles GG Schmidt: http://www.cggschmidt.com/

Pete

jeff100's picture

(post #93459, reply #11 of 13)

I found the exact same size knives (6 1/8" long X 11/16" wide X 1/8" thick) as what came out of my Sears jointer from Freud on Amazon.com, Freud C400  $16.74 for a set of three.  Free shipping too if you get the order to a minimum of $25.00.  Order two sets maybe??


Jeff


 

JohnWW's picture

(post #93459, reply #2 of 13)

Four questions:


1.  Is this the Craftsman jointer with the long cast iron base and no adjustment for the height of the outfeed table?


2.  Are the screws holding the wedge socket head screws, that go down through the wedge, or are they hex head screws that go into the side of the wedge?


3.  Are there blade height adjuster screws in addition to the wedge locking screws?


4.  Are the wedges and blades rusted?


John White, Shop Manager, Fine Woodworking magazine   


Edited 3/30/2006 11:40 am ET by JohnWW

John White Shop Manager for FWW Magazine, 1998 to 2007

CPR's picture

(post #93459, reply #4 of 13)

I'll try to answer the questions as best I can:


1.  There is no height adjustment for the outfeed table.


2.   The screws into the wedge are denoted as socket head screws in the manual. 


3.   There are height adjusting screws as well.


4.   I don't see any significant rust anywhere on the cutter assembly.  I did notice fine sawdust etc. in the small voids at the bottom of the wedges.


Thanks for the help.


CPR

JohnWW's picture

(post #93459, reply #7 of 13)

Start out by completely removing the socket head screws that hold the wedge shaped gib in place, this will eliminate any chance that they are preventing the wedge from coming loose.  If the screws are frozen in place and can't be turned you have a more difficult problem.


With the screws out, try again to tap on the end of the wedge to loosen it up.  If the wedge is still tight, back out the height adjusting screws to lift the blade, this should pull the wedge free.  If the height adjusting screws are frozen in place or can't exert enough force to loosen the wedge, again you have a more difficult problem.


If none of my suggestions work, or if the screws are frozen in place, loosening the blades will be a much harder job, so try out the above procedure first and let me know if you're successful.


John W.

John White Shop Manager for FWW Magazine, 1998 to 2007

CPR's picture

(post #93459, reply #8 of 13)

Thanks for the help.  I'll try it this weekend and let you know how I made out.  I watched the "Tuning a Jointer" video also and learned some great stuff.

PeteBradley's picture

(post #93459, reply #9 of 13)

> Start out by completely removing the socket head screws that hold the wedge shaped gib in place...

Is this possible with the wedge in place?

Pete

JohnWW's picture

(post #93459, reply #12 of 13)

Pete,

This jointer does not have conventional gibs where the bolts are threaded into the gib and bear against the sides of the slot. On this machine the bolts go vertically through the wedges and are threaded into the head.

John W.

John White Shop Manager for FWW Magazine, 1998 to 2007

Jumpman's picture

(post #93459, reply #3 of 13)

You may be able to find a manual for your machine at this website:


http://www.owwm.com/


Good luck.

highfigh's picture

(post #93459, reply #13 of 13)

If you need penetrating oil. I would recommend PB Blaster over WD 40. PB is the best I have tried. Just a little on the parts that are stuck together and let it sit awhile.

"I cut this piece four times and it's still too short."

"I cut this piece four times and it's still too short."