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How Do I Balance a Grinder Wheel

Acer_sp's picture

I have a 6" Ryobi Bench Grinder, Changed the stock wheels to a Norton White art80w 10A 60 J5VBECX5 on the left side; and a Norton Grey A 36 N 5V on the right side. Both are 3/4" thick, 1/2" arbor. Problem is they are out of balance. I have search for an answer in the archives and other places, no luck. Anyone at all with any help would be great. I cant sharpen a thing this way. I have water splashing out of my cooling tray. Tools rattling all over the place. Help!!!!

iceman101's picture

You can use a grinder (post #146796, reply #1 of 13)

You can use a grinder dressing wheel to true up the wheel just google it there are several kinds from star wheels to diamond

Acer_sp's picture

Tried That. As a matter of (post #146796, reply #8 of 13)

Tried That. As a matter of fact IT IS the first item of buisness that I do to a wheel; I soften the egdes. Thanks

Craig

forestgirl's picture

First of all, are you sure (post #146796, reply #2 of 13)

First of all, are you sure it's the wheels and not the grinder? (just have to ask, sorry)

Not sure about the gray Norton, but the white one should be decent quality. I've heard of bad batches, and retailers replacing bad wheels.

More to the point of your question, you can balance using a Oneway balancing kit. However, if the wheel wobbles from side to side, a balancing kit won't help. So, what to do?? First, do what the first responder here suggestion, using a dressing tool to get the surface of the wheel concentric with the hub. If the wheel wobbles from side to side, you can try tapping the hub to make sure it's seated right. I've not done this myself, but I know a couple people who have laid the wheel on a solid, flat surface, set a socket that's just a hair smaller than the hub (NOT bigger!), and tapped it to seat the hub.

If you feel you need to balance the wheel, the way a tire is balanced, then the Oneway system is what you need. Be sure and get the kit that will fit your grinder axle.
http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/store/Sharpening___Grinders___Wheels__...

forestgirl -- you can take the girl out of the forest, but you can't take the forest out of the girl ;-) 

Acer_sp's picture

Thanks for the input. Nope (post #146796, reply #9 of 13)

Thanks for the input. Nope not the grinder, I Dialed it, and runout is near to none,

Craig

JoeRo's picture

Sounds like your bushings are (post #146796, reply #3 of 13)

Sounds like your bushings are the wrong size. The shaft might be metric.

forestgirl's picture

Jo, please explain what leads (post #146796, reply #4 of 13)

Jo, please explain what leads to this conclusion. Bushings (and shafts) on the common grinders are pretty darned standard from what I've seen.

forestgirl -- you can take the girl out of the forest, but you can't take the forest out of the girl ;-) 

JoeRo's picture

You are probably right about (post #146796, reply #5 of 13)

You are probably right about the shaft and bushing being of the same standard. My first thought was that the bushing was just the wrong size or was missing. I have seen this happen on grinders and table saws where someone would grab up a replacement blade or wheel and install it without realizing that a bushing was the wrong size or had fallen out during storage. Believe me , it will vibrate. By the way, many foreign products have metric parts these days. I believe Ryobi products were first made in Japan.

Acer_sp's picture

Guess what? those stupid (post #146796, reply #10 of 13)

Guess what? those stupid little plactic bushings are the cause. They are loose fitting' and at full grinder rpm well I say no more. Cause found, problem to be fixed.

THANKS ALL

Craig

DonStephan's picture

You could unplug the grinder, (post #146796, reply #6 of 13)

You could unplug the grinder, clamp a reference scrap of wood or metal to the support or tabletop, and then slowly rotate the grinder by hand. This will indicate if one or both wheels are wobbling.
If there's no wobbling, I don't think two wheels are needed for brief operation - a few seconds. Take off one wheel at a time to see which is causing the shaking. Be sure to stand to the side when you turn on with only one wheel attached.
Is the grinder bolted to the tabletop?

WillGeorge's picture

I think all the posts so far (post #146796, reply #7 of 13)

I think all the posts so far give good advice but I would test the tool's vibration using only one wheel at a time. In other words, remove both wheels and 'see/hear/whatever?' if the tool vibrates more or less.

Pick one side of the armature shaft and then attach a grinding wheel and run it. Then attach the other grinding wheel to the same shaft and run it. (As in only one side of the armature shaft has a wheel attached.

'See' if the vibration is the same or worse with one of the wheels... Then do the same on the other side shaft.

This 'MAY' tell you which grinding wheel is the problem or if the armature shaft is defective. A wheel that ran OK on one side of the shaft and NOT the other side may suggest a bad armature shaft.

I am NOT knocking Ryobi tools. I, in fact, have more than several of them. Tools that are hard to beat at the price!

I think my $99 Ryobi tools are far from junk. They do a great job at a reasonable price. I do admit that I am NOT a big fan of Ryobi Batteries!

As a new thought.. Be sure about how your grinder is mounted. Is it attached firmly to a solid base and not the whole stand moving?

Have a great day.. Life is wonderful even if you are having a bad day!

Acer_sp's picture

As to answer some of your (post #146796, reply #11 of 13)

As to answer some of your questions: The Ryobi Brand is a fair to good piece. I have it mounted to a 1 1/2" plywood deck which allows me to store it away; or clamp it down several ways. Trust me when I say it never shoockkk like this before. The run out on either side of the armature is fine. I do not like the idea of only one wheel on one side, even for short durations, I think this could case problems. Ever seen someone have a wheel on one side then a wire-wheel on the other. Thanks again to all.

Craig

forestgirl's picture

Craig, any chance you could (post #146796, reply #12 of 13)

Craig, any chance you could return to the retailer, ask 'em to give you a different wheel from hopefully a different batch? Norton wheels should be a cut above others, and the one(s) you got sound worse that what came stock on my cheap slow-speed grinder! (yikes)

forestgirl -- you can take the girl out of the forest, but you can't take the forest out of the girl ;-) 

saulgood's picture

Hey, visiting from (post #146796, reply #13 of 13)

Hey, visiting from "breaktime" when I noticed your question. I have a lowbrow solution that is not as scientifical as those above, but I swear it worked for me. One time when my new grinding wheel was acting up and threatening to shake my shop to pieces, I took an older wheel and stuck a bolt through the center. It wasn't even a tight fit, but when I grabbed the crude assembly on either end and held it(edge to edge) against the new wheel spinning on the grinder - BOTH wheels were balanced in about two seconds. It sounded like "grrrrrrrhmmmmmmmmmmm". Wear gloves. and goggles...