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Delta drill press switch replacement?

Peter Morton's picture

I've got a Delta dp350 Drill press and the power switch has died a second time. The first one was covered under warranty. This one I'll have to pay for... The problem? It has been on back order for 3 months! And Delta says they won't have it 'til the end of June '06. The date has been pushed back several times. Is there another switch that will do the job? With a wiring diagram, can I wire a different switch? I need this thing to work! Thanks!---Peter

JohnWW's picture

(post #99555, reply #1 of 21)

From looking at a photograph of the machine, the switch appears to be a simple on/off switch, the variable speed on that model is mechanical.  You could replace the switch with a simple toggle light switch if the mounting holes will allow it, otherwise an automotive style toggle switch installed through a blank cover will do the job. 


The motor is only a 1/3 HP so the switch won't have to handle a lot of current, something rated 10 to 15 amps will be adequate.  The wiring should be simple, one wire in, one wire out, they could be hooked up either way, and possibly a ground wire to the switch housing.  If you have more wires than that, post back for some guidance.  Before ordering a replacement switch take a look at the old one to see if the wiring is as simple as I described.


Grizzly sells a replacement switch, part #G8991, that looks like it might be a direct replacement for the Delta switch, the sizes are pretty much standardized.  The price is $8.50, you could probably order four of the Grizzly switches for the price of the factory part.


John White, Shop Manager, Fine Woodworking Magazine

John White Shop Manager for FWW Magazine, 1998 to 2007

Peter Morton's picture

(post #99555, reply #2 of 21)

Thanks for the reply, John. There are four spade connectors on the switch. The wires on one side are black (negative) and white (positive) on the other. The circuit is grounded with two green wires that are not connected to the switch (as far as I can see), but to the drill press housing itself. The +,-, and ground feed in through one, jacketed wire. The +/- go to the bottom of the switch. There are a pair of wires on each side for the other two spade connectors. A pair of each is connected to the corresponding side and leads elsewhere... to the motor I assume. Six wires total. The switch is made by Kedu and is called the HY52. I have a PDF of the schematic. (http://kedu.cn/pdf%5CHY52.pdf) The "function," I think, is #3. The markings look like #6. The switch does not control a lamp. I'm no electrician, but it seems that I could wire a switch to do what the one in the picture does. I just need to know what to buy. The Grizzly site doesn't give a schematic. Attached are photos, just in case. Thank you again for your help.

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JohnWW's picture

(post #99555, reply #3 of 21)

I'm glad I suggested looking at the switch before ordering anything.  Thanks for including pictures, they are a big help. 


At first, it appeared that the switch is set up so that the motor can be run on either a 110 volt circuit or a 220 volt circuit.  For 110 volt service, only one lead is hot, the black one if the plug is wired properly, and only that lead needs to be switched.  In a 110 volt circuit the white is a neutral and doesn't need to be switched, but there is no harm done if it is switched. 


For 220 volts, both the black and white leads are hot and both need to be switched to cut power to the motor, so I originally thought the switch was set up that way to allow the machine to be used on either voltage.  It appears however that the drill only comes with a 110 volt motor so having the switch set up for 220 volts doesn't make a lot of sense.


I looked up the drill's wiring diagram on the Delta web site and they only show a black and white pair of wires coming into the switch and another black and white pair leaving the switch, the extra black and white pair that's piggybacked onto the switch must be for the lamp and they are probably on the cord side so the lamp can be lit when the motor is off. 


In fact the lamp may be the only reason why they set up the wiring this way, they are using the switch terminals as a terminal block to tie in the lamp.  It was a convenient way to hook up the wiring for the light, but they had to get both the white and black leads onto the switch to make the lamp hook up.


The biggest problem I can see right away is that the opening for the switch in the casting is small and it pretty much forces you to use a similar switch to hook up all that wiring in such a small space. 


The alternative would be to mount a new standard electrical box, either on the front of the drill over the switch opening or somewhere else on the machine.  A new box would allow you to use a simple, cheap and locally available switch.  If you want to go this route I can give you some general advice but you'll have to work out a lot of the details.  


John W. 


Edited 6/5/2006 6:50 pm ET by JohnWW


Edited 6/5/2006 6:58 pm ET by JohnWW

John White Shop Manager for FWW Magazine, 1998 to 2007

cadiddlehopper's picture

(post #99555, reply #5 of 21)

What is wrong with simple paddle switches except that the cost less? These excessively expensive push button switches remind me of automobile headlights. There have been few, if any, products as serviceable, especially with price considered, as sealed beam headlights. Yet they have been redesigned countless times since the Reagan administration at an astronomical cost to the public. Don't give me that aerodynamic baloney. It seems to me that a universal design paddle switch for stationary power tools is possible with voltage & current ratings being the criteria for different models. They could be available at every hardware store. Why are there so many? I rant.

Cadiddlehopper

JohnWW's picture

(post #99555, reply #7 of 21)

A perfectly good, and reasonable, rant, I agree 100%.  Tools used to be built with most of the components as standard off the shelf hardware that could be replaced in any well stocked hardware store.


John White, Shop Manager, Fine Woodworking Magazine

John White Shop Manager for FWW Magazine, 1998 to 2007

Peter Morton's picture

(post #99555, reply #8 of 21)

That's progress, eh? On the other hand, we do have an amazing array of products available today at a reasonable cost. It's a tradeoff. But I expected more from Delta... I agree with the rant, too. I'll report on the Grizzly switch when it arrives. THanks again, fellas!

dgreen's picture

(post #99555, reply #9 of 21)

Delta is now Black and Pecker Default, the folks who bring you the firestorm and the stuff for the "all my tools are yella" crowd. Parts have gone to he@@ since the takeover.

Since the house is on fire let us warm ourselves. ~Italian Proverb

 

 

................................................

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.
~ Denis Diderot

dwolsten's picture

(post #99555, reply #10 of 21)

There have been few, if any, products as serviceable, especially with price considered, as sealed beam headlights. Yet they have been redesigned countless times since the Reagan administration at an astronomical cost to the public. Don't give me that aerodynamic baloney.

Oh, please. Headlights have been "redesigned" because the customers demanded it and were willing to pay for it. It's the free market at work.

Why not use sealed-beam headlights?

1) Style. People don't want ugly, boxy, 70s and 80s style cars any more. They want stylish cars, which require headlights designed to match the car's aesthetics.

You're on a woodworking forum. How do you design the furniture you build? Do you use ANY styling elements at all, or do you make your furniture as simple and plain as possible? If you do anything not absolutely required in your woodworking for absolute functionality, then you are guilty of hypocrisy.

2) Wastefulness. When you replace a halogen bulb in a modern car, you just throw away a small bulb. When you replace a sealed-beam unit, you throw away a large assembly with a lot of glass and metal.

3) HIDs. The newest cars use HID (high-intensity discharge) headlights which output far more light, and in a more usable (whiter) spectrum than the old halogen bulbs. These require specially-designed projectors to avoid blinding other drivers. You want to mandate that everyone be stuck with 80s headlight technology forever?

And I certainly don't know where this "astronomical cost" idea comes from. Regular halogen bulbs cost about $10 at Wal-Mart, and if my car is any indicator, they seem to last at least 10 years. I wouldn't call that astronomical.

cadiddlehopper's picture

(post #99555, reply #11 of 21)

I admit to a rant. Did I touch a nerve also? "the customers demanded it and were willing to pay for it." The vast majority of customers never even realized that such technology existed. Many of us weren't willing to pay especially when we finally got the bill; auto mfrs gave us no choice in the matter. "..don't want ugly, boxy, 70s and 80s style cars..." Personally, I wish I still had mine from that time. More headroom. One of my favorites was a '65 wagon. My '90s car was a Trooper. What is boxier except a Hummer? Today I have a van, not mini, for hauling long hardwood pieces. I would prefer that it have round sealed beams, but it doesn't. Forward night vision is no better either.

As to bulb waste & life: In 50 years of owning multiple vehicles (I drve them a long time, too), I have replaced 3 sealed beams. Only one burned out. Flying rocks got the others. I paid ~$3 for my last sealed beam. They were cheap because they are not complicated assemblies of many parts. They are quite simple. The 2-piece rectangular jobs went for ~$7. They would leak. I had a leaky reflector on my Trooper, too. Costly! The astronomical cost is documented in a back issue of Consumer Reports. If you suffer rock damage to a "headlight assembly" you will find out what is meant by astronomical.

As for the pseudo-science about "usable spectrum" & "specially designed reflectors," I believe that came from the advertising department, not the engineering or science one. It doesn't jibe with my own experience either, especially the part about "avoiding blinding." I have considered replacing my own lamps just so I could blind in return.

As for the free market at work: Customer demand does not specify which products will be available for purchase. Rather, some enterprising individual is at work scheming as to how he can get those with a little cash to turn it over to him in exchange for something for which he paid less. The schemers have produced many fine products in pursuit of wealth. At some point in time, however, product improvement becomes impossible. That is when advertising departments come in. They convince us that we need them though we don't. That may be why you want HID headlamps. BTW, Adam Smith's invisible hand reaches into the hip pocket, it does not balance supply & demand. I prefer to believe in the tooth fairy rather than the invisible hand. There is equal proof.

I'm not sure that your near accusation of hypocrisy should be allowed on this forum. However, my WW style furniture is highly functional with few frills for the most part. I design my own stuff. A couple of items emulate Wendell Castle, so I can be frivolous. Engineering design is what I did in my working life. I don't know what you do in real life, but I feel well qualified to make design judgments. One of them is that sealed beam headlights offered drivers the best value that has ever been available. I believe they were required by regulation prior to the Reagan administration when Elizabeth Dole changed it.

Cadiddlehopper

dwolsten's picture

(post #99555, reply #12 of 21)

Well I'm an electrical engineer, so I think I'm qualified to make design judgments as well. For HIDs, you probably haven't driven with any because otherwise you'd know they produce far better lighting than halogens. I have a set on my workbench and they're quite amazing.

Personally, I wish I still had mine from that time. More headroom. One of my favorites was a '65 wagon.

Nothing is stopping you from going and buying a 65 wagon, or any other old car. They're out there, and they're usually quite cheap. No one ever forced you to buy a new car. You act like the car companies have forced you into buying new cars every so often.

My '90s car was a Trooper. What is boxier except a Hummer?

A Trooper isn't even a car, and certainly isn't typical of mid-90s cars, any more than a Hummer is typical of modern cars. No one forced you to buy such an ugly, boxy vehicle at a time when many nicer vehicles were available. If you didn't like it, why'd you buy it?

I would prefer that it have round sealed beams, but it doesn't.

Then go buy yourself a 1975 van that does. It'd probably only cost $100 or so. Of course, it might need some work, but you claim to be an engineer so surely that wouldn't be too hard for you.

They would leak. I had a leaky reflector on my Trooper, too. Costly! The astronomical cost is documented in a back issue of Consumer Reports.

That's what you get for buying a POS vehicle. Should have done some research first. Hondas and Toyotas are well-regarded as being extremely reliable, and my 12-year-old Honda has never had any serious trouble of any kind, certainly not with the headlights.

As for the pseudo-science about "usable spectrum" & "specially designed reflectors," I believe that came from the advertising department, not the engineering or science one.

Yeah, whatever. Doesn't sound like you were much of an engineer if you don't understand simple concepts like projector lenses and basic optics, and the light spectrum produced by various lighting types and actually stoop to calling it all "pseudoscience". This isn't antigravity; do you call semiconductor physics a "pseudoscience" as well, even though they're responsible for this forum? You sound like a Luddite. Do you also rant about airbags being useless items that marketers invented?

As for the free market at work: Customer demand does not specify which products will be available for purchase. Rather, some enterprising individual is at work scheming as to how he can get those with a little cash to turn it over to him in exchange for something for which he paid less. The schemers have produced many fine products in pursuit of wealth. At some point in time, however, product improvement becomes impossible. That is when advertising departments come in. They convince us that we need them though we don't. That may be why you want HID headlamps.

Holy crap, you have an amazingly naive view of economics. Maybe you'd prefer to live someplace like the old Soviet Union where you don't have to worry about making any choices about what to buy, because the all-knowing State does that for you.

It's really simple: if you don't want to buy a new car, or new anything else for that matter, don't! You can keep your old one. I see lots of really old cars driving around here on a regular basis. There's a guy down the street from me with what appears to be a car from the 1920s.

If you don't believe that newer lighting technologies are technically superior to Edison's incandescence, then you're free to live in your fantasy land, but don't try to convince anyone else of this idiocy. Lemme guess, you use incandescent lights in your woodshop instead of fluorescent lights, right? Incandescents (including halogens) have a poor color spectrum compared to any discharge lighting (HID or fluorescent), if you don't believe me, go to a library and read about it.

cadiddlehopper's picture

(post #99555, reply #15 of 21)

I found a really raw nerve! It is MHO that you are so convinced of the superiority of your own viewpoint that any further comments are a waste of time even though all of them can be argued. BTW, I almost loved my Trooper which was very faithful & looked good to me. My current van has great headroom, too. My shop & house are lighted mostly by fluorescents. You make me suspect that you regularly practice errant prejudgment ("Lemme guess"). As for my "amazingly naive view of economics": I have no doubt that I can tell you a thing or two as found in the many nonfiction books that I read.

Please confess to a rant as I did & have the courage to respect another well-founded rant.

Cadiddlehopper

Peter Morton's picture

(post #99555, reply #16 of 21)

Well, the Grizzly switch arrived and it works like a charm. I had to file the opening a bit and make a spacer for clearance, but it works and I have a drill press again. Thank you all for your helpful advice, especially the part number from Grizzly! Sorry that this thread got so heated over technology... it seems we invent things to make our lives easier and they often have the opposite effect! Cheers!

Ray1955's picture

HELP (post #99555, reply #21 of 21)

Well, I have not used my drill press for over a yr and half and hardly used it prior.  I have a problem when I needed it

I set it up so I could drill some holes in a bracket for my motorcyle and after a little time it shut off and the light stayed on.

I noticed I have the same electrical set up as the man above.  I am not sure what my problem is.  I would like to jump the motor

to see if that will work.....but dont know how to do that.  I have a 10" bench Delta Drill Press, thats what the writing on the motor says but it looks just like the DP350.

I am not one to finally get a tool like this and then throw it away.  If it can be fixed, I would like to keep it around a while any chance you could help me?  I guess it would be good to see if the motor works.

 

Ray

mike4244's picture

(post #99555, reply #4 of 21)

I had the same problem, had a Grizzly switch that fit perfectly.The griizzly switch is $3.95, same spade connectors and exact same size. Model # g8988 , paddle switch,110 or 220 volts 10 amps.Page 214 in 2006 catalog.


If you need something else from the catalog, get it now,the shipping on one switch was almost double the cost of the switch.I think I payed $7.95 shipping for a $3.95 part.


mike

Peter Morton's picture

(post #99555, reply #6 of 21)

Great! An easy solution!
I run it at 110v. John, you've been a great help, and if the Grizzly switch doesn't work, I'll post here again and dig a little deeper into the machine housing. I'm really ticked at Delta. It seems like they would support their product a little better. Oh, well... I'll try the Grizzly switch, since that sounds easiest... I'll probably order two!

coolbreeze's picture

(post #99555, reply #13 of 21)

I have has to replace mine twice and I am a hobbyist who does not use the DP all that much. IMHO, there is a quality control problem with the switch.


The only theing I could suggest is that if you can get the switch in the "on" postition, you can hook up a remote switch like is often used for DC systems. That is what I had to do until I got the new switch.


Things never break until you need them.

John_D's picture

(post #99555, reply #14 of 21)

Things never break until you need them.


Necessarily true.  I also like "Why do I always find things in the last place I look?"


My goal is for my work to outlast me.  Expect my joinery to get simpler as time goes by.
My goal is for my work to outlast me.  Expect my joinery to get simpler as time goes by.
Mrhermit's picture

(post #99555, reply #17 of 21)

Try Tool Parts Direct at http://www.toolpartsdirect.com
They have your model listed and may have the part you need in stock.
If the part # you are looking for is 904121, they have it listed for $22.96.

Peter Morton's picture

(post #99555, reply #18 of 21)

I tried ToolBarn/ToolPartsDirect and it was backordered there, too. The $3 or $4 part from Grizzly is a much better solution. The stock switch has broken twice at $20 each... It seems unwise to try it again. I bought two of the Grizzly switches. We'll see if they last longer. If they don't, at least @Grizzly I can call and talk to someone and raise heck! I'm finished with Delta. Thank you for your help, though.

jarhead8286's picture

(post #99555, reply #19 of 21)

Just recently, a second switch on my DP-350 has died. I used the drill press maybe a total of 1/2 hour. The first switch was replaced under warranty 3 months ago. First time I had to wait for the switch about 3 weeks to arrive and I just may give Grizzly switch a try. I called Delta and explained the situation - the CS rep told me that they are not aware of any issues with the switch on DP350's, but said that she will mail me 2 new switches whenever they get them.

kajtx's picture

Replacement switch for Delta drill press (post #99555, reply #20 of 21)

You can purchase a replacement switch from McMaster-Carr (www.mcmaster.com), part number 7194K18 (high starting amp DPST, 16 amp) for $13.24.  It will fit into the switch panel and you can clip on the electrical leads just like on the original. 

I appreciated this forum since previous posts told me not to waste time and money on a replacement switch from Delta. This replacement appears to be of much better quality and it works perfectly.

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