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Building over baseboard heaters

Libraryroom's picture

Hello,

I am installing bookcases and I need to build them over baseboard heaters. Has anyone ever done this before? I am new at this and I hope the plan I have devised works.

Thank you.

Pondfish's picture

(post #121138, reply #1 of 10)

Maybe you should tell us what your plan is...


Two things to pay attention to are to ensure good air flow and to protect the wood above from being over heated.


A 12" wide bookcase hanging close over a baseboard heater will restrict air flow.  Move the bookcase up as much as you can, or move the radiator forward to the front edge of the bookcase.


I redid my baseboard heat wall to have a wooden cover under wainscoting.  I used reflective insulation foil to direct heat out and reduce heat to the wood above. 


When we bought our current house, the previous owners had installed kitchen cabinets over the baseboard heat.  It didn't do a good job of heating the kitchen, other than it helped heat the bottom shelf of the pantry.  (We've since redone the kitchen).


 


Recommending the use of "Hide Signatures" option under "My Preferences" since 2005
Recommending the use of "Hide Signatures" option under "My Preferences" since 2005
Libraryroom's picture

(post #121138, reply #9 of 10)

Thank you for the advice.

LB

DaveRicheson's picture

(post #121138, reply #2 of 10)

Electric  or hot water heat?


Either case moving the heater would be better than building over it. The heater would beome useless behind a book case.


 


Dave

mufti's picture

(post #121138, reply #3 of 10)

            My son is a bookbinder, his first thought was have a care for the books.

EdHarrow's picture

(post #121138, reply #4 of 10)

Moving hot-water baseboard ain't always a trivial job...


Given that the typical baseboard unit is ~ 2" deep, how about spacing the bookshelf assembly off the wall by some similar amount using furring strips.  Seems like that would provide a reasonable chimney effect.  Put foil on wall and wallside of bookcase - voila?


(I'm assuming that the book cases aren't closed and don't  extend to the floor, of course)

DaveRicheson's picture

(post #121138, reply #5 of 10)

Moving hot-water baseboard ain't always a trivial job...


Neither is a built in bookcase. If this is a DIY for the op, then just removing and capping the heater or doing a bypass loop is better than leaving it in place. The heater will be of no functional use, once it is covered by a bookcase. If this is for a client, the same thing applies, but now it is the clients' cost and decisions.


 


Dave

JeffHeath's picture

(post #121138, reply #6 of 10)

OK


Just so you know, it is done quite frequently.  Raising the bookcase up a little higher on the wall, and insulating the bottom of the wooden surface facing down is the first step.  5/8" moisture resistant drywall over some rigid foam insulation does an excellent job of protecting the bottom of the wood.


Also available are blowers that attach inline under cabinets, and are wired to the solenoid switch for the heating circuit.  When the thermostat calls for heat, the boiler fires.  Also, the thermostat triggers the pump for the circuit that heats the given area.  The same signal turns on the blower, if it's wired correctly.  My kitchen cabinets are built over baseboard heat in this matter, and the room has functioned perfectly for 7 years.


Before you ask, I tried to see if I could find a brand name, but couldn't.  It's way back there, and I'm not taking the cabinets out to find out (NO OFFENSE!)  Any competent heating contractor can hook you up with this type of blower.


Whatever you do, don't restrict the air flow.


Jeff

A distinguished graduate of the School of Hard Knocks
Libraryroom's picture

(post #121138, reply #8 of 10)

Thank you for the advice. I am thinking about building the base for the bookcases four inches above the heater and, taking your advice, insulate the bottom and install some kind of air blower or circulator.

John

KiddervilleAcres's picture

(post #121138, reply #7 of 10)

I would tend to agree with mufti. 


Heat and the glues that bind books together don't generally agree with each other.  Provide more than adequate ventilation if you must place your prized prose above a heat source.


Regards,


Bob @ Kidderville Acres


 


A Woodworkers mind should be the sharpest tool in the shop!

Bob @ Kidderville Acres

A Woodworkers mind should be the sharpest tool in the shop!

rosemarie786's picture

Would a gas heating system of (post #121138, reply #10 of 10)

Would a gas heating system of 13 years be considered as old?

How long in average does a heating system "live"?

How much are they, and where are the best ones on the market, what makes?

is there anyone one here with an idea on this? thank you
 

All is well