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Bent Lamination Display Cabinet

Reg66's picture

Bent Lamination Display Cabinet (post #170593)

. I've been working on this for quite a while. It seems as though the longer a project takes the more errors are made. This one might be unfit to sell. On the other hand, it's really a prototype and I got to develop several new skill sets: bent laminating, mortise and tenon joinery on curved rails, ebony inlays, fully captured glazing and precision routing for Soss invisible hinges. I'm having two curved front glass shelves being made this week and that will be the final step.
        I used rift sawn red oak for the case and plain sliced, book matched, flat sawn red oak plywood for the back. Rift sawn means the board was cut from the log in such a way that the growth rings intersect the edges and faces of the board at ~45 degrees. This results in all faces and edges with the same, straight grain pattern.
        Except for the laminated rails and the glued up top and bottom all the other connections are either sliding dovetails, sex bolt clamped mortise and tenon joints or held with screws as in the case of the plywood back. The center mullions in the doors is actually held in place by the flat panels. The idea was to have a cabinet that could be completely, or nearly completely disassembled and shipped in a flat pack for reassembly by the customer with a screw driver. Sort of a custom furniture version of IKEA.
Regis


 

roc's picture

Brilliant ! Way to go (post #170593, reply #1 of 12)

Brilliant !

Way to go !

Just when I get kind of bored and fed up that people don't even say anything at all when I answer their post some one like you comes along and makes it a joy again to be here.

Thank's.

I really enjoy looking at the grain of the back through the curved glass.  It must be even more fun in person.

roc

Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe. Abraham Lincoln ( 54° shaves )

Reg66's picture

Cabinet glazing (post #170593, reply #4 of 12)

Hi Roc,
Thanks for the kind remarks.
I just spent about an hour composing, with photos, how the flat acrylic panels were mounted in the curve doors and when I clicked on preview the spam filter threw me out.
I'm not a happy person at the moment, especially when the site has highlighted that browser first spam!!!
Regis

Reg66's picture

Cabinet glazing (post #170593, reply #5 of 12)

Hi Roc,
Thanks for the kind remarks.
I just spent about an hour composing, with photos, how the flat acrylic panels were mounted in the curve doors and when I clicked on preview the spam filter threw me out.
I'm not a happy person at the moment, especially when the site has highlighted that browser first spam!!!
Regis

Westchester's picture

Cabinet (post #170593, reply #2 of 12)

Great job - the wood choice would have been mine as well.  Golden age of oak c. 2012 - Could you talk more about how you did the bent laminations -

SA

Reg66's picture

Bending form (post #170593, reply #6 of 12)

SA
The curved rails were made by resawing 11/2" rift sawn oak into ~1/8" leaves and gluing them back together while clamped to a bending form.
The M&T corner joints in the doors were made on the Leigh FMT using a curved fixture to mount the rail and present it to the router as though it was straight in order to make the tenon. Can't find the picture of that set up at the moment.
Regis

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Reg66's picture

M&T joints (post #170593, reply #7 of 12)

SA,
The fixture for the tenons on the ends of the curved rails is a simple band sawed chock block cut to the radius of the rail curvature. The end of the rail is then presented to the router as though it's a straight section. The photos show the rail clamped to the underside of the FMT jig ready for the tenon to be cut.

Regis

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RalphBarker's picture

Curves (post #170593, reply #3 of 12)

Nicely done, Regis.

Where did you get the glass for the doors? Was it custome bent to your specs? Or, was it a stock curve, around which you adjusted your design?

Reg66's picture

Curved doors with flat acrylic panels (post #170593, reply #10 of 12)

Hi Ralph,
This site is so frustrating. See my reply to roc.
I tried to post this project on the Burl but am no longer able to attach photos there.
The panels are captured in straight 3/32" grooves in the curved rails. They  were made by attaching a template to the bending form, aligning it with the centerline of the panels and routing the grooves. The stile grooves are straightforward on the router table. The mullions were more challenging. Started with a trapizoid shape and routed the grooves at the table with the bevel side down and after routing ripped the angled sides away to get the 4 degree angled groove in the sides of the mullion so they align with the straight groove in the rails.
Full size drawings were essential for this project and a front surface mirror helped to establish tangents to the curved rails for laying ou the cuts.
Regis

RalphBarker's picture

Thanks (post #170593, reply #12 of 12)

Thanks for the added into, Regis.

Yes, the forum software can be quite frustrating. I sent Lisa Morgan, the FWW person assigned to be a contact for Knots, a note, asking that you be added to the "trusted user" list. Once she does that, your posts should bypass the silly spam filter.

Reg66's picture

Glazing groove template (post #170593, reply #11 of 12)

I dug around to find some photos of the grooving template. The simple slot accepts a PC type guide busing.The centerline on the template is lined up with the centerline of the glass (acrylic) panel in the rail and attached to the bending form allowing the 3/32" groove to be plowed with the router. Relocating the template to the other half of the rail allows the other groove to be cut.
Unfortunately there are no pics of thetrapizoid precursor to the finished mullion. It must have been one of those rare days when everything went so well that the camera was forgotten. The plywood section below the template in the second pic is a spacer to keep the rail tight against the underside of the template.
Regis

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Westchester's picture

Done With Percision (post #170593, reply #8 of 12)

Reg -

This is a project that FWW could feature in their magazine.  Also a Gazabo by Julie profilied a few weeks ago here.  You folks have all the photos from start to completion.  Ed what do you think about these projects - give us a thought here !

Two last questions - what glue for the laminations - and are the doors clear plexi acrylic / or glass.  If glass - how did you figure the curve ?

SA

Reg66's picture

Glue and glazing (post #170593, reply #9 of 12)

SA,
The laminations were made with Titebond III; looking for more open time to get the 3/16" x 1"  steel caul and all the clamps in place. See reply to your earlier comment
The door glazing is 0.089"  flat acrylic rather than heavier glass which would not have been adequately supported by the two small Soss hinges. See latest replies above about how the panels were captured by straight grooves on the curved rails, straight stiles and the mullions.
Flattered that the work could be considered for a FWW feature. You have no idea how close this project became to firewood.
Thanks for your comments and questions. More activity than I've seen around here for quite a while.
Regis