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Attaching a table top to a log base

gbarron1's picture

I'm building a redwood table.  The top is 72" x 54" and the base will be a 28" diameter stump halved vertically for two half round legs.  I'm considering using side rails but concerned that cutting a mortise in the flat sides of the stump halves will be awkward and inaccurate.  Would figure 8 supports work?   The top is probably about 150 lbs.  If I do use side rails, could I attach with blocks?

flairwoodworks's picture

I can't quite envision what (post #148566, reply #1 of 6)

I can't quite envision what you mean by side rails.  Are they about a foot off the ground like in a trestle table, or directly below the tabletop?

How much will the table be moved?  If it wouldn't be moved much, you could just use dowels to ensure the top doesn't shift independently of the legs, as is done with workbenches.  The dowels would be glued into the legs, but left loose in the top - if you lift the top, the legs remain.

Chris @ www.flairwoodworks.com
and http://flairwoodworks.wordpress.com

 - Success is not the key to happiness.  Happiness is the key to success.  If you love what you are doing, you will be successful. - Albert Schweitzer

gbarron1's picture

they're directly below the (post #148566, reply #2 of 6)

they're directly below the table top, like an apron.  Dowels certainly seems easy.  What would I need to do to allow for expansion/contraction of the tabletop?

sapwood's picture

I think I would fasten the (post #148566, reply #3 of 6)

I think I would fasten the two half logs together by using a sub-top made of 1/2" plywood. This could be edge banded for appearances sake. Then cut slots into the plywood for screws that will attach the finished top. I wouldn't bother with any elaborate means of attaching the ply to the logs.... long screws would be my choice.

A note of caution. Be sure to leave an air space between the log and the floor. Use plastic or wood glides to maintain this bit of separation. If the log has any residual moisture, direct contact with the floor will surely create a mold haven.

gbarron1's picture

Thanks for the tip.  (post #148566, reply #4 of 6)

Thanks for the tip.  Understand that slots cut into the plywood will accomodate wood movement in the top.  What do I do about movement in the stumps?

flairwoodworks's picture

I'm guessing your stumps are (post #148566, reply #5 of 6)

I'm guessing your stumps are not dry.  Use one screw in the center, and a couple on either side but make sure you put the outside ones in slotted holes to allow for movement.

Chris @ www.flairwoodworks.com
and http://flairwoodworks.wordpress.com

 - Success is not the key to happiness.  Happiness is the key to success.  If you love what you are doing, you will be successful. - Albert Schweitzer

sapwood's picture

Well you could slot the screw (post #148566, reply #6 of 6)

Well you could slot the screw holes for those fasteners also, but I think I simply wouldn't bother. So what if the stump develops a bit of a crack. It's a stump!