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Old Stanley Plane

solo1001's picture

Old Stanley Plane (post #170869)

Hi -- I"m doing my best to learn about woodworking.  I ran by an antique store today and found an older Stanley plane.  The model number his H1247 and it's blue and red.  I can't find any information about it online and every time I type it into google, I get a variety of ebay auctions.  Does anyone know anything about this plane?  

 

Chris

Metod's picture

Performance (post #170869, reply #1 of 9)

If you are interested in the performance of the plane, then its color csheme and 'genealogy' probably will not matter much. If possible, inspect the plane visually to determine how much work it need s to function properly. 

"antique' might have some pshychogical value, but none whatsoever of the performance/working benefits. 

Best wishes,

Metod

whitedogstr8leg's picture

The 1247 (post #170869, reply #2 of 9)

was by Stanley, and sold as part of the Handyman Lineup.  I have the 1249 one.    They run about $4-$6 usually.    They can be tuned up and made into a better "User" than any of the new Stanley block planes being sold today.

give me a picture, I'll give you a finished piece

PreviewAttachmentSize
A Stanley #110, and a #1249
A Stanley #110, and a #12491.26 MB
solo1001's picture

Thanks to both of you.  I (post #170869, reply #3 of 9)

Thanks to both of you.  I agree that antique probably does have psychological value.  Flea Market was probably a better description.  I'm getting halfway through my 30's now and really starting to appreciate American made craftsmanship.  They really don't make them like they use to.  At the very least, I can learn a lot about setting a plane up with this.  Thanks again.

 

Chris

RalphBarker's picture

old vs. new (post #170869, reply #5 of 9)

While I agree that quality of many (not all) pre-1950s tools was quite good, I also agree with Metod - Lie Nielsen and Veritas planes are excellent, and better in some ways than the old Stanleys. The difference, of course, is in the price.

As an aside, I recently discovered what amounts to a pay stub from the mid-1800s of one of my ancestors in amongst some old photos. He got paid $2.50 for a week's work.

Admiralnj's picture

Generally, any Stanley plane (post #170869, reply #8 of 9)

Generally, any Stanley plane that is blue, red, maroon are not the best of quality.  You want black japanned planes, made when Stanley still gave a hoot about quality.  Things started to fall off the cliff around 1960 for them in terms of quality, fit and finish - which all affect performance.  So in the future, pass on any plane of a different color or you'll just have an exercise in frustration trying to make it work properly unless you are very experienced in fettling planes.

whitedogstr8leg's picture

Blue Stanley block planes (post #170869, reply #9 of 9)

Recently, I went through my stash of block planes.   The handyman did alright, I just don't like the #120 style of planes.  I do like the #220 style better though..

give me a picture, I'll give you a finished piece

PreviewAttachmentSize
Stanley #220 Blue painted
Stanley #220 Blue painted638.68 KB
Metod's picture

Planes (post #170869, reply #4 of 9)

Chris,

'They really don't make them like they use to. "

Have you tried LN or Veritas brands?

Best wishes,

Metod

solo1001's picture

LN and Veritas (post #170869, reply #6 of 9)

I have not tried those yet.  I am married and if I bought those right now I might not be married.  As I progress, hopefully I can start using more high end stuff.  

RalphBarker's picture

Tool-buying strategies (post #170869, reply #7 of 9)

Timing is everything when it comes to tool buying. The best time to buy a tool is when it is needed to build something she wants. ;-)