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Bad Dog drill bits

paol's picture

Bad Dog drill bits (post #103567)

Hi, I went to the San Mateo Woodworkers show over the weekend and saw the demonstration of Bad Dog drill bits. Drilling through a file, glass, stainless steel etc., one after the other, with a handheld drill. (WHAT A DRILL!)


I've searched the internet for a independent evaluation to no avail.. most of what I find is "they look great but I figure there is some gimic..." comments going back a number of years.


 


Common sense tells me, if they had something no one else has, it would soon be analysed and copied. Now, they ARE expensive and I don't know ANYTHING about metallurgy (including how to spell it) so.... What's up? Has anyone seen a independent evaluation of the Bad Dog products?  Thanx! Paul

mwenz's picture

(post #103567, reply #1 of 22)

Good question. Answers to which I also am curious.


I drill through hardened steel everyday. I too have seen them at the shows but just never parted with any money yet. I currently use carbide bits. Spendy and fragile.


Take care, Mike

BilWil's picture

(post #103567, reply #2 of 22)

I haven't seen any independent tests or reviews.  I do have a co-worker who has used them, bought them at the Novi, MI show a couple of years age.  I was with him and we were both impressed.  He has used them and concluded that they aren't worth the extra cost.  I tried them once, but it was after he had used them for a couple of months so that may not be a good test.  He said he couldn't get them sharp again, neither of us could figure that.

tkb's picture

(post #103567, reply #3 of 22)

I got a set as a gift a few years ago. The tips aren't always centered, the drill body is a rather soft metal that flexes easily. They don't spin true so accurate drilling should not be expected. The 1/4" bit refused to drill into concrete, while the 1/2" worked fine. Perhaps I haven't figured out the right drilling technique for these things because they tend to break easily for me. The manf does have lifetime replacement warranty - I've had three or four replaced.

-Toby


Edited 10/30/2006 11:32 am ET by tkb

-Toby
mvflaim's picture

(post #103567, reply #4 of 22)

I'm the same way as Toby. the ones I bought don't drill true and they break easily. I've had better luck using regular bits drilling through metal than I've had with Bad Dog. Needless to say if I had to do it all over again, I'd stick to conventional bits and buy a Drill Doctor.


I also bought the forstner type bits (forget what they're called). I use them more often simply because the shafts are longer than a regular forstner bit but I haven't tried drilling anything other than wood with them. The ones I use most often are dull and I haven't tried sharpening them yet so I'm not sure how hard it is to do or how sharp I'll get them.


 


Tell me and I'll forget, show me and I'll remember, but let me try and I will understand.
Steinmetz's picture

(post #103567, reply #5 of 22)

Don't continue using dull forstner bits... not only will they round over the cutting edge ,but will destroy the clearance behind the leading edge.
Buy a flat mill file. Paint the area at the bottom's shearing edge with a magic marker. clamp the bit in a vise. Hold the file steady on the flat ramp and file upwards away from the edge. It only takes a few strokes. As you file, the bluing will show less and less. Stop when the leading edge is sharp enough to 'nick' your thumbnail.
Steinmetz.


Edited 10/30/2006 5:25 pm ET by Steinmetz

highfigh's picture

(post #103567, reply #6 of 22)

Bad Dog Forstner bits are carbide on the normal cutting edges and the sides. A mill file will do approximately squat. The twist drills go through a Nicholson file with no trouble at all.

To everyone else, they replace them for any reason and if you contact them about the off-centerdness, they'll take care of you. I have a set of the twist drills and have used them mostly for concrete but I have a hammer drill. Some steel drilling and a little in wood where it didn't matter if it was a clean cut or not. My drill doesn't do 2500 RPM like his Dewalt, either, if it's the normal demonstrator.
"I cut this piece four times and it's still too short."


Edited 10/30/2006 5:41 pm by highfigh

"I cut this piece four times and it's still too short."
dgreen's picture

(post #103567, reply #7 of 22)

According to their web page there is a $5.00 per bit shipping and handling charge should you need to avail yourself of the lifetime warranty.

------------------------------------


 The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools.
-- Herbert Spencer (1891)

 

 

................................................

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.
~ Denis Diderot

highfigh's picture

(post #103567, reply #8 of 22)

I know- the guy who demos their stuff recommends trying to last long enough to send more than one bit at a time.

"I cut this piece four times and it's still too short."

"I cut this piece four times and it's still too short."
dgreen's picture

(post #103567, reply #10 of 22)

It says "return the bit(s) along with $5.00 per bit". Seems steep since they are only paying to mail them back.

------------------------------------


 The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools.
-- Herbert Spencer (1891)

 

 

................................................

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.
~ Denis Diderot

highfigh's picture

(post #103567, reply #11 of 22)

At 5 bucks a crack, they aren't even paying for the shipping, then. Maybe it's for handling. They also replace them at the WoodWorking Shows, so no shipping or handling is paid.

"I cut this piece four times and it's still too short."

"I cut this piece four times and it's still too short."
dgreen's picture

(post #103567, reply #12 of 22)

Not saying it does not happen, but the website says they will not be replaced at trade shows.


Bad Dog Rover Bits are covered by a Lifetime Satisfaction Guarantee.  We will repair or replace any Rover Bits that becomes dull or damaged.  Return the bit(s) along with $5 USD per Rover Bit for shipping and handling.  Please note:  weight constraints limit replacement of Rover Bits to mail only.  Sorry, they cannot be replaced at trade shows.


------------------------------------


 The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools.
-- Herbert Spencer (1891)

 

 

................................................

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.
~ Denis Diderot

highfigh's picture

(post #103567, reply #13 of 22)

Well, that has changed since the last show in Feb. They do tend to sell out pretty fast, though. If they were dealing with returns, they would A) never get anything else done or B) have to carry too much inventory. IMO, for the price, they should cover the first replacement at no charge.

"I cut this piece four times and it's still too short."

"I cut this piece four times and it's still too short."
Steinmetz's picture

(post #103567, reply #14 of 22)

highfigh, I stand corrected. After re- reading mvflaim's original post, I assumed he had refered to regular steel forstner bits. Obviously, they must also be carbide A diamond hone should do the job but will not correct non concentricity. Steinmetz.

Edited 10/30/2006 9:43 pm ET by Steinmetz

Edited 10/30/2006 9:48 pm ET by Steinmetz


Edited 10/30/2006 9:49 pm ET by Steinmetz

paol's picture

(post #103567, reply #15 of 22)

My thanx to everyone for their contribution on the subject of Bad Dog drill bits. The conclusion I have reached is that there is serious doubt about Bad Dog drill bits performance and thier value based on original cost and the $5.00 S & H fee for replacements. I would want to see independant testing that supported Bad Dogs claims that they are worth the price before I buy them. paol

mvflaim's picture

(post #103567, reply #16 of 22)

paol,


I'd still buy their Rover bits. I find them quite handy with their long shafts however they are pricey at $200 if memory serves me correctly. The drill bits I'd shy away from.


 


 


Tell me and I'll forget, show me and I'll remember, but let me try and I will understand.
doug hyde's picture

(post #103567, reply #17 of 22)

my brother got a set of bits to drill out a car lock the bad dogs are DOGS he went to D& D bits and did better. don't get them save your money.

nikkiwood's picture

(post #103567, reply #18 of 22)

I saw these for the first time at a recent JLC Live.

I was tempted, but did not spring for them, since they had that "too good to be true" ring about them.

With the comments here, I'm glad I didn't.

********************************************************
"It is what we learn after we think we know it all, that counts."

John Wooden 1910-

******************************************************** "It is what we learn after we think we know it all, that counts." John Wooden 1910-
highfigh's picture

(post #103567, reply #19 of 22)

What are D&D bits?

For drilling metals, HSS, cobalt and titanium nitride are better if the drill isn't capable of high speeds.

Why drill it out when a slim-jim or pick set work so well?

"I cut this piece four times and it's still too short."
"I cut this piece four times and it's still too short."
doug hyde's picture

(post #103567, reply #20 of 22)

the way you take the lock out is use the key and turn,but when you buy and old MERCEDES BENZ WITH out keys you have to drill out the lock to get it out.  b&d  black & Decker

Edited 11/1/2006 4:10 pm ET by doug hyde


Edited 11/1/2006 4:36 pm ET by doug hyde

highfigh's picture

(post #103567, reply #21 of 22)

"but when you buy and old MERCEDES BENZ WITH keys "

I thought you meant B&D but it showed D&D, so I thought I would ask.

If it has keys, I would assume the doors can be unlocked. Since the lock has a retainer inside the door (IIRC), the door panel needs to come off anyway, so why drill them out?

Old cars- they'll get you in the end.

"I cut this piece four times and it's still too short."
"I cut this piece four times and it's still too short."
JLMCDANIEL's picture

(post #103567, reply #9 of 22)

I bought a set at the woodworking show in Columbus, Oh. They went in the dumpster. They are off center and don't hold there edge. My set of Dewalt Titanium coated bits out performed them to the point that there is no comparison.


Jack

HeatherWillman's picture

Bad Dog customer service is HORRIBLE (post #103567, reply #22 of 22)

HORRIBLE EXPERIENCE!! My mother tried to order some Bad Dog products for my father for their anniversary. She's not too savvy on the computer so I helped her. We made our way through placing the order, but the confirmation delivery email did not state when she would receive the products and the tracking was not yet showing any information. So I called Bad Dog to try and get the information. I explained I was calling for my mother and just wanted to get an idea of when she would receive the package. The girl on the phone seemed to have a slight attitude when saying, "did you look at the email." I thought I might have misread the attitude so I let it slide and explained the tracking was not yet showing any information so I just wanted to get an idea of the delivery time. She came back with a MAJOR attitude then (no mistaking this one) and said, "it's on there, you just need to read." I then said, "why do you have such an attitude, I'm just trying to figure out when my mom will receive this. I see the link to bring up tracking, but it's not showing any information yet because we just placed the order." She obviously didn't like that I was calling her behavior out because she then said, "well if you'd stop being such an idiot and read then you would know." At this point I'm shocked and trying to keep my voice down because I was nursing my 4 month old son at the time. I told her I needed to speak with her supervisor. She said she was the owner, she's canceling my order, and then she hung up on me. I then tell my husband about the experience, and ask him to call because the things I wanted to call back and say to her would not have been helping the situation and were not appropriate while I was holding my son in my arms. He looked at the email first and verified it did not say when my mother could expect the package. He then called for me and said the words, "I'm calling on behalf of my wife." She must of known he was my husband because she immediately cut him off and started blurting out her version and blatantly lying about how it all went down, which was completely irrelevant, all he wanted was to get the order through for my mother. He really didn't care what had transpired earlier. So he sits and listens, waiting for a chance to say something so we can just move forward. He finally had enough, interrupted, and said, "well I know that's not how it went down." Which she came back and said she didn't want to have anything to do with our family and the order was canceled. So not sure what side of the bed she woke up on this morning and how a simple question of "when can my mother be expecting the package" set her off, but if you're big on customer service when you order products this is NOT the company for you!! My father is building a shop and had plans to order many of their products, but that won't be happening now.