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720 paring chisels

ctsjr82's picture

I sent an email suggestion to the good folks at Lie-Nielsen today, asking that they consider making a paring chisel based on the Stanley 720--longer steel rather than the optional longer handle they now offer on their 750 replicas. Any one out there in knots know why they haven't yet, or if they will? Surely I can't be the first to suggest this. I think with the 720 design, A2 steel and ground to a 25 degree bevel, you'd have a winner on your hands. What are some of your currently available paring chisels? Tom

"Notice that at no time do my fingers leave my hand"

"Notice that at no time do my fingers leave my hand"
joinerswork's picture

(post #103934, reply #1 of 12)

cts,


Derek has at least 720 chisels, you can, too.


Ray

Planesaw's picture

(post #103934, reply #2 of 12)

I don't know about L-N, but why not just get a set of 720s?  The cost would be the same or less than if L-N made them.


Alan - planesaw

ctsjr82's picture

(post #103934, reply #4 of 12)

I would if I could...eBay is the easiest source, and the 720's I've watched there are going for more than the LN are new, and the LN is better steel. Either that or they are in such bad shape they are not worth bidding on. I don't live in the NE and don't have time to hit swap meets and flea markets. I just thought since LN has made a mark by reproducing Stanley designs with modern materials, and since their 750 reproductions are a great tool, why not do the 720? Tom

"Notice that at no time do my fingers leave my hand"

"Notice that at no time do my fingers leave my hand"
RyanC's picture

(post #103934, reply #3 of 12)

If Tom himself doesn't reply I would be extremely surprised.  Ever since I read the article in this magazine "Lie-Nielsen at 25" I've been fascinated with tool making.  At one point I thought "why not" and emailed Tom telling him how much it inspired me and how hard it must be to get started and he emailed me back within a few days just basically saying thank you and encouraging me.  Good guy and if I had the money I'd buy from him too lol.

ctsjr82's picture

(post #103934, reply #5 of 12)

I wasn't very clear at the end of the original post. I meant, What are your favorite paring chisels that are being sold by companies today? Sorry for the confusion. Tom

"Notice that at no time do my fingers leave my hand"

"Notice that at no time do my fingers leave my hand"
mwenz's picture

(post #103934, reply #6 of 12)

I meant, What are your favorite paring chisels that are being sold by companies today?


Paring chisels? Or chisel used for paring?


Paring chisels I use older long Sorbys. Currently there are also the long Henry Taylors being sold as well as the Sorbys. The HTs have a bit better steel than the Sorbys.


Other than that, which ever chisel is in my hand that I use for paring is my favorite.


Take care, Mike

Troys's picture

(post #103934, reply #7 of 12)

You could always go with a Japanese chisel there are many paring chisels from that corner of the world.

Troy

mapleman's picture

(post #103934, reply #8 of 12)

I meant, What are your favorite paring chisels that are being sold by companies today?


My favorite chisels used for paring are my Blue Spruce chisels. They are not particularly long like a true paring chisel - but they are the nicest chisels I have ever laid my hands on.


So I guess they fall into "chisels used for paring" - not "paring chisels" category


Lee


Edited 8/11/2007 12:38 am by mapleman

mwenz's picture

(post #103934, reply #9 of 12)

Hey Lee,


I was just having fun with the OP. In the traditional English sense, paring chisels are very long and very thin. I do have some and they work very well for, well, paring. Shown below is paring between twin tenons.



I also have some Blue Spruce and having had them for some time, they are my go to chisels for paring out between DTs. And this next picture shows why...



The sides simply meet the face at a near zero side-flat. Simply wonderful chisels. Hold an edge incredibly well and are a delight to use.


For larger work, though, I do rely on my long paring chisels.


Take care, Mike

mapleman's picture

(post #103934, reply #10 of 12)

Hey Mike,


I hope I didn't come off sounding like a smart a**, I actually agree with you - there are paring chisels and chisels for paring.  The blue spruce don't really fit the "paring chisel" standard because of the length - in my opinion. So I didn't want the purists here to criticize me for recommending something that the OP wasn't really asking for. I was just kind of throwing out how impressed I was by them.


Cheers,


Lee


P.S. - How's the saws coming? He He  (sorry, just had to ask ;)

derekcohen's picture

(post #103934, reply #11 of 12)

there are paring chisels and chisels for paring


I agree, Lee. Both the Blue Spruce (which I have) and the LN/720 types are simply wonderful chisels to use for detail work. They have this terrific balance that just makes them feel an extension of your hand. While I chose BS in the end, there was little in it against the LNs.


It makes you wonder where the advantage lies with more tradtional, longer, thinner bladed paring chisels (such as my Bergs).


I've been trying to determine why I would use one over the other (other than just ear marking the BS for dovetails). The shorter chisels seem to provide more accuracy, while the longer impart more momentum and power. I wonder how others see it?


Regards from Perth


Derek

mwenz's picture

(post #103934, reply #12 of 12)

I hope I didn't come off sounding like a smart a**,


Absolutely not, Lee! I was rather didactic in my cheeky response I suspect. A problem of trying to sum a response into a pithy one-liner.


And Derek wrote:
I've been trying to determine why I would use one over the other (other than just ear marking the BS for dovetails). The shorter chisels seem to provide more accuracy, while the longer impart more momentum and power. I wonder how others see it?


Well, at the risk of exposing some more cheek...I use the BS and Lee Valley "detail chisels" for...hold on...details. <insert smiley face here>. I do use both for fairly rigorous work, but smaller rigorous work. I would probably use the BS chisels for moderately-sized rigorous work if I had some larger sizes.


Here are two pictures. Both are working a DT socket into a long credanza rail. There was stretchers made with the corresponding male DT end. Used to tie the front and back top/bottom 7' rails together in two places (which divided the space into thirds).


First up is the long Sorby paring chisel (which is what I was using in the picture of the tenon).



That was paring into the wide edges of the socket sides and back. Here is using a small thin chisel paring in the bottom through the relatively small neck so that I could angle the chisel to strike the full bottom of the socket.



In short, there are uses for both long and short paring chisels. I would still say the main hallmark for either type is relative thinness.


For the upper pictures where I am using the long traditional paring chisels there are two issues why I favor them in general. One, I can stand fairly erect at my bench when paring downward. Two, I can use both hands spaced far enough apart to allow better control than a shorter chisel. Well, and how about a third one? Three, I can easily use more of my body weight (using my shoulder) to pare heavily when needed.


It's difficult for me at times to separate my personal preference and the way I was taught when they both align. This is one of the cases.


Take care, Mike
who's workin' Lee...getting closer...but it is going slow. Keep getting diverted to the boys' tasks.