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wood garage door repair

Chipper's picture

    I want to remove and repair the rotted woodwork on the bottom section panel of a 4 section panel wood painted electric garage door.  The garage door style/design is 4 separate sectioned panels attached by metal hinged hardware & rollers. Each section has 2 x 4 wood around the perimeter & 3 1x vertical styles in the center of each panel section.  Between the stiles are 5 inlayed 1/4"inch thick wood panels.         Any suggestions, advice, or insight for what would be considered quality, adequate, and durable for the joinery technique(s) used for reassembly of the bottom rail of the lower section panel, and reassembly of 3 stiles, and 2 inset panels?  What is the best exterior grade adhesive to use?  What hardware would you recommend?    And how the heck do I reinstall/reattach the steel cable to both bottom,  side ends of the lower section panel when I reattach it, and set it in the steel rail guides?   Any advice is greatly appreciated!!!!        Thank You!!!!!                                   Chipper                      mrjparker@comcast.net     10/12


 


 

RANGERP75R's picture

(post #79489, reply #1 of 7)

chipper


   I will let the guys that really know their stuff answer most of the questions here. I have (it seems) the exact set-up on my garage door. With the wood, you will always get moisture at the bottom panels from back-splash and it goes first. You might consider replacing the door period. Just a thought.


   I scanned the bottom panel visually then measured. Built it before I took the door down. Basically duplicated what was there. That was tongue and groove on the stiles. The adhesive is not of major importance as the tongue and groove actually held it in. You will have to caulk before you re-paint to weather-proof the outside anyway.


   Getting it down and re-installed? It will require a host of freinds. This will give you an opportunity to find out who your real friends really are. < G >


   There is a company in south Atlanta that will rebuild sections on these old type wooden doors. Was about $125. If I ever decide to just repair the bottom again, they will get a call from me. In short, a pain in the old hinny, IMO. I'd rather be WW. ha..ha.. 


Luck...


sarge..jt

Proud member of the :  "I Rocked With ToolDoc Club" .... :>) 

SawdustSteve's picture

(post #79489, reply #2 of 7)

Chipper... Before you begin, check the following....Bring the door to its 'full up' position.  There should be no (or very little) tension on the cable / spring system.  If that is correct, lower the door, back out the screws 1/4 inch..   just enough so you know they are not tight.      Next, bring thje door all the way up.  Disconnect the cable / bracket assembly.  Be careful that it does not fly out of your hands.  With the help of a strong friend or two, remove the screws that hold the lower part of the door to the hinges.  Leave the hinge connected to section #2.   It will swing down, leaving the remaining panels supported by the rollers.  Remove the screws from one of the 'bottom' roller supports.  The door section can now be lowered to the ground.  As a safety, place a good sized C-Clamp in the rail to keep the remaining sections in the 'up' position.  Repair / replace the lowest section and reverse the proceedure to get the new section in place.  If you're making your own replacement, think of using CVA or similar treated wood to prevent rot.  You may evenm be able to use the old door as a pattern for trimming the bottom strip.  Don't forget to seal the bottom edge with a GOOD paint to keep it from absorbing moisture.      SawdustSteve

RANGERP75R's picture

(post #79489, reply #3 of 7)

Steve


   Ya da man... It was about 10 years ago when I replaced one. I had forgot that the bottom panel can be removed without removing the entire door. I remember having to keep that door up with an adjustable height roller and then replacing it without ever taking the door off the tracks. Kind of self-explantory when you look at it.


   Do you do this or related work for a living? Sounds like you might have done one or two or three. What I do remember is I had to get a couple of neighbors to help with the physical end.


   Excellent, detailed instructions. I'm still going to contact the folks I mentioned the next time. Getting old. ha..ha.


Regards...


sarge..jt

Proud member of the :  "I Rocked With ToolDoc Club" .... :>) 

SawdustSteve's picture

(post #79489, reply #4 of 7)

Sarge...   Not too much experience... just fixing garage doors for various homes that various members of my family own.  I guess that my title 'woodworker' translates to 'handyman' for friends & family.  In my old age I have gotten smarter... Just get a local contractor to replace the whole door with an aluminum and insulation door.  They're lighter, don't need to be painted as often and they match the pug-ugly look / color of vinyl siding!!   I'm glad that my instructions jogged som memories in your mind.    SawdustSteve

RANGERP75R's picture

(post #79489, reply #5 of 7)

Steve


   After reading your post it hit me. I remember it was a pain as I was acting alone. Had to get help finally. Building the new panel was a breeze, but re-installing isn't a one man job for me. And you're right, the newer doors are insulated better and lighter. I have great windows in those doors as my front shop is the entire garage. I hated to replace at that time cause I couldn't find any new doors with large windows.


   Next time I will replace as some of the doors now do. I keep the doors painted with exterior paint often hoping next time is not anytime soon.


   Take care and you might get one of those plaster-paris cast with the zipper. If a neighbor or relative pulls in your drive-way and they even hint of the look of you doing something for them, quickly put it on and pretend the double compound fracture is really painful even after the re-set.


   And don't let your wife read this. If she does, you might be having cooked southern goose for dinner soon. ha..ha..


Regards...


sarge..jt

Proud member of the :  "I Rocked With ToolDoc Club" .... :>) 

TenPenny's picture

(post #79489, reply #6 of 7)

I did a quick and dirty one man job to replace the inset panels on our old doors.


Raise the door up about halfway and stop it.  Put a couple of sawhorses under the door.  Lower the door until the bottom sits on or just above the horses.  Unbolt the hinges connecting the sections together, and you may want to stick a couple of clamps onto the roller guides to keep it from moving.  Then you can raise the rest of the door up out of the way, and if you've done it right, lay the bottom piece onto the horses. 


On my door, the stiles were mortise & tenoned into the rails, and pinned with small nails; it was easy to pull the small nails out and disassemble the door.


If this is a single car width door, you can probably manhandle it single handed.

RANGERP75R's picture

(post #79489, reply #7 of 7)

T P


   I think Chipper will read your post. I do have two single doors and basically did what you and Steve referred to. As I stated to Steve, I'm having it replaced with a metal next time as I'm getting old and lazy. ha..ha..


   Thanks for the post, I'm sure Chipper has picked up some good angles from both Steve's and your post.


Regards...


sarge..jt

Proud member of the :  "I Rocked With ToolDoc Club" .... :>)