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rbogle's picture

I recently had trouble trying to pattern route 1 1/4 red oak. no matter how light the cut it would kick back and bust the piece. I never had a problem with 3/4 inch material.Does anyone know why? thanks Ron PS bit was 1/2inch 2inch long


Edited 9/9/2009 1:50 pm ET by rbogle

JiminFla's picture

(post #89326, reply #1 of 9)

Sounds like you were climb cutting.  You need to go from left to right if you're using the router without a router table; right to left with a router table so that the router follows the pattern.


Jim


JohnWW's picture

(post #89326, reply #2 of 9)

Straight flute bit?

John White
Shop Manager for FWW Magazine, 1998 to 2007

John White Shop Manager for FWW Magazine, 1998 to 2007

rbogle's picture

(post #89326, reply #6 of 9)

yes it was straight bit not spiral but have used same bit on 3/4 with no problems

JohnWW's picture

(post #89326, reply #8 of 9)

Straight bits take intermittent bites twice per revolution. At some point, as the stock gets thicker, the resulting forces become hard to control as the bit digs into the wide cut surface. You will probably find that a spiral bit, which cuts continuously, will give better control.

If you aren't doing this already, making this cut on a router table, with a starting pin, rather than guiding the router by hand, will also improve your chances of making a smooth cut.

John White
Shop Manager for FWW Magazine, 1998 to 2007

John White Shop Manager for FWW Magazine, 1998 to 2007

rbogle's picture

(post #89326, reply #9 of 9)

thank you very much, it makes sense. Ron

DougGF's picture

(post #89326, reply #3 of 9)

How big was the piece?  What you are describing is not uncommon when smaller pieces are being outed on a table without adequate holddowns.


Bad bit?


Edited 9/9/2009 3:48 pm ET by DougGF

Senomozi's picture

(post #89326, reply #4 of 9)

Message http://forums.taunton.com/fw-knots/messages?msg=47692.4 is a post I did to answer someone who was having similar problem. Perhaps this applies to your situation?

Madison2's picture

(post #89326, reply #5 of 9)

Bogle:


I recently did a small production run of oak library chairs, the back legs were cut from 8/4 oak on the bandsaw and then final shaping was done with a jig and my handy P/C router and a big 4 1/2 inch long 1/2 inch diameter carbide upcut spiral bit.  Worked like a charm, no kickback and nice clean surfaces.  I think it is a Whiteside bit.  After 48 legs it is still sharp and no burn marks.


Madison 

rbogle's picture

(post #89326, reply #7 of 9)

Thanks maybe straight bit wont work well on thicker material.