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Gorilla Glue Heat Resistance

davcefai's picture

Not a woodworking question but it _is_ about glue.

Does anybody know what temperatures Gorilla Glue can withstand? The makers carefully avoid quoting any numbers. Extensive googling only reaults in "withstands extreme heat and cold" but with a couple of hints that "extreme" is 120 deg F.

I need to fix a cooking pot lid handle. Both Araldite and superglue have softened and failed. It seems that most epoxies fail above 85-90 deg C.

roc's picture

(post #89380, reply #1 of 4)

Gorrilla lists " Fix Pot Handle " right in the information flyer they sent me when I signed up for technical info to be sent to me.

Seriously though

You could try JB Weld automotive epoxy
temperature resistant up to 600F

http://www.amazon.com/J-B-Weld-8265-S-Cold/dp/B0006O1ICE/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&s=automotive&qid=1254074374&sr=8-7

but will leave a gray glue line. In theory you can add dry powdered dye pigment to the epoxy without messing with its strength

http://www.woodcraft.com/Family/2000760/2000760.aspx

sprinkle and mix, sprinkle and mix, sprinkle and mix, very thoroughly so there are no lumps of weakness/pigment.

roc

Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe. Abraham Lincoln ( 54° shaves )

Edited 9/27/2009 2:09 pm by roc <!-- ROC2013 -->


Edited 9/27/2009 2:10 pm by roc

roc

Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe. Abraham Lincoln ( 54° shaves )

davcefai's picture

(post #89380, reply #2 of 4)

Thanks roc.

JB Weld is not available here. If Gorilla fails then it will be time to try one of the engine repair epoxies but as you say - grey line.

BenM's picture

(post #89380, reply #3 of 4)

Are you just gluing the wood know directly to the metal pot cover?  With the differences in expansion/contraction of metal and wood you may get a failure.  Can you drill a hole in the cover and use a machine screw to secure the knob?

davcefai's picture

(post #89380, reply #4 of 4)

I should have been clearer.

The knobs are plastic and have a dial thermometer inside them. Great idea - except that we are now up to 3 broken out of a set of nine. The walls of the hollow knobs are probably too thin. Essentially I will be glueing up a 1.5mm tube.