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Watco Wipe on poly

larry101's picture

Watco Wipe on poly (post #112338)

Humble newbie


I have just completed a black walnut jewlery box.  I tried watco wipe on poly.  I applied three coats so far.  First with a foam brush and wiped off, then two coats using 0000 steel wool as an applicator and throroughly dry with cloth.  The results are OK but it looks kind of dull.


 


Should I just keep adding coats??


Is the steel wool applicator appropriate??


Thanks

saschafer's picture

(post #112338, reply #1 of 9)

Do the instructions for the wipe-on poly say to wipe it off afterwards? I ask because that's the way you apply Watco oil/varnish mix ("classic" Watco, so to speak), but wipe-on poly is usually wiped on and then left to dry that way, not wiped off.


-Steve


 

larry101's picture

(post #112338, reply #2 of 9)

I was varying from the directions based upon a suggestion from a furniture maker.  The directions say to apply with a rag but I was told to use 0000 steel wool.  His projects look really good so I took his advice. 

saschafer's picture

(post #112338, reply #3 of 9)

I'm not talking about how you applied it; I'm referring to the part about wiping it off afterwards. Did you? If so, do the instructions on the can say to? Is it possible that the person whose advice you're following was talking about "classic" Watco, rather than wipe-on poly?


-Steve


 

HowardAcheson's picture

(post #112338, reply #9 of 9)

>> I was varying from the directions based upon a suggestion from a furniture maker. The directions say to apply with a rag but I was told to use 0000 steel wool. His projects look really good so I took his advice.

Follow the manufacturer's instruction that are on the label. I suspect your source was confusing the Watco Danish OIl for the Watco Wiping Poly. The wiping product should not be wiped off. You wipe it on and let it dry. Then lightly sand with 320 paper and apply a couple of more coats. They builds film on the surface of the wood and it's the film that produces a gloss.

Howie.........
Howie.........
MikeHennessy's picture

(post #112338, reply #4 of 9)

I haven't used Watco, but I often use wipe-on poly. I use a 3-M pad or 220 wet/dry sandpaper if I want some abrasion -- this helps generate a slurry to fill the pores in the wood and/or even out the prior coat. I'd stay away from steel wool -- it can leave rust stains on the wood, especially with a water-borne finish.


I'm not sure what you mean by "thoroughly dry with cloth"? Are you wiping it off after you apply it with the steel wool? If so, I think that might be your problem. Just apply a thin coat and let it dry. What gloss are you using? I'd recommend gloss for the first coats, even if you want satin -- just apply satin for the last coat or two. I generally apply my wipe-on finishes with an applicator made like you'd use for shellac -- a nice ball of wool (and old sock works well) inside a clean, lint-free cotton (or linen, if I have any around) rag.


Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA
Everything fits, until you put glue on it.

Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA
Everything fits, until you put glue on it.

doorboy's picture

(post #112338, reply #5 of 9)

There's good advice that already been given, but I'll just reiterate that the poly should be LEFT TO DRY after you apply it.
You will need as many coats as it takes to achieve the look you're after. It might be three, it might be six or more. You'll know it when you see it.

GregoryPaolini's picture

(post #112338, reply #6 of 9)

Keep in mind, that 0000 steel wool is an abrasive, and will impart micro scratches in the finish as it's applied.  Under those conditions, I think a satin finish my be all you're going to get.  You may want to revert to just applying and wiping off with a rag, or switch over to a different finish if you're looking for a high gloss - Shellac would bond well the the previously applied wipe on finish, and can be polished up to a mirror sheen


 


Hope this helps


Gregory Paolini


www.GregoryPaolini.com

Gregory Paolini

www.GregoryPaolini.com

Private & Small Group Woodworking Classes in the Great Smokey Mountains

larry101's picture

(post #112338, reply #7 of 9)

Thanks all


I put  light coat of watco wipe on poly on last night with a rag.  This morning there was an obvious increase in sheen.  The coat seemed uneven so I am wondering if I applyied uneven.  I will continue to experiment one step at a time. 


 


Thanks again

saschafer's picture

(post #112338, reply #8 of 9)

With wipe-on finishes, it takes about three coats for there to be enough "averaging out" of the application to get a uniform-looking sheen.


-Steve