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How Long Does it take Tung to cure

BioHaz1906's picture

I'm waiting to put a topcat on a tabletop that I finished with Tung oil and it says wait until it is fully cured but I can't find anywhere an estimation on how long it takes tung to cure.  Any suggestions, by the way it is NOT pure tung oil is is Formby's.  Thanks for the help.


Bio

flairwoodworks's picture

(post #111894, reply #1 of 31)

Bio,


I'm not familiar with Formby's, but polymerized tung oil takes up to about 24 hours to dry.  To cure, I'd give it at least a week, but less than a month.


Chris @ www.flairwoodwork.spaces.live.com


 - Success is not the key to happines.  Happiness is the key to success.  If you love what you are doing, you will be successful. - Albert Schweitzer

Chris @ www.flairwoodworks.com
and http://flairwoodworks.wordpress.com

 - Success is not the key to happiness.  Happiness is the key to success.  If you love what you are doing, you will be successful. - Albert Schweitzer

BioHaz1906's picture

(post #111894, reply #2 of 31)

Thanks.  The can says 12 hours between coats but mentions nothing about total curing.  I'm wanting to put a wax on top of it but didnt' want to rush it.


Bio

HowardAcheson's picture

(post #111894, reply #3 of 31)

Formby's Tung Oil finish is just a thinned wiping varnish. It contains no real tung oil at all. Being a varnish, it should be ready for re-coating within a few hours and dry enough to use in 24-48 hours.

As it's a varnish there is absolutely no need for any other top coat. Being thinned, just apply 4-5 applications and you are done. Nothing else will add to its durability.

Howie.........
Howie.........
BioHaz1906's picture

(post #111894, reply #4 of 31)

I was thinking of putting a paste wax on top of it, is that not necessary?


Bio

chaim's picture

(post #111894, reply #5 of 31)

The wax is purely a matter of taste.


If a rubbed out finish is what your aiming for give it a least a couple of weeks to totally cure and rub out the finish with paste wax and 0000 steel wool. 


Don't rub too hard your just trying to level the surface and be careful not to cut the edges too much or you run the risk of cutting through the finish. Go over the piece with a soft cotton rag and some mineral spirits to remove the steel wool particles.  Then after it dries wax it again and polish the surface with another rag.


Do this two or three times and your done!


 This makes a good finish great, gives a nice sheen and is perfect for a varnish finish.


Post pics after your done!


LOL,


Chaim


 

 

BioHaz1906's picture

(post #111894, reply #6 of 31)

Is that laugh because it is going to be a big task?

chaim's picture

(post #111894, reply #7 of 31)

LOL, lots of luck.


Yeah finishing is real work and can in some cases take as long as it did to build the piece.


It could just be me. although I'm not particularly meticulous it takes me a long time to get the finish right. After all it can be what makes or breaks a nice piece of furniture!


Chaim


 

 

BioHaz1906's picture

(post #111894, reply #10 of 31)

I thought LOL was Laugh out Loud that is why I was curious.  I have been wanting to try a hand rubbed finish and I figured what better time than now.  Thanks for the help.


Bio


 

AZMO's picture

(post #111894, reply #12 of 31)

I regard LOL as laughing out loud as well. But if we are talking in a finish forum, maybe, just maybe, LOL is lots of luck....

                  


-----------_o


---------_'\-,>


-------(*)/ (*)   www.EarthArtLandscape.com

BioHaz1906's picture

(post #111894, reply #14 of 31)

Yeah it is big deal, I just got worried when I saw it at the end because I thought it was an illusion to a watch out, here it comes type deal :)


 


Bio

chaim's picture

(post #111894, reply #13 of 31)

You know what I could be wrong! Its been known to happen (just ask my wife)


Chaim


 

 

HowardAcheson's picture

(post #111894, reply #8 of 31)

>> I was thinking of putting a paste wax on top of it, is that not necessary?

Waxing is not necessary for additional protection or durability. It's only benefit is that it improves the tactile sensation when you rub your had over it. Once you do wax, you will need to repeat it periodically to maintain the appearance and feel.

Howie.........
Howie.........
BioHaz1906's picture

(post #111894, reply #11 of 31)

If I don't wax it out is it ok to wet sand the top coat with 600 grit sand paper charged with a lil bit of the oil to get a nice even surface?


Bio

HowardAcheson's picture

(post #111894, reply #15 of 31)

>> If I don't wax it out is it ok to wet sand the top coat with 600 grit sand paper charged with a lil bit of the oil to get a nice even surface?

Keep in mind that Formby's Tung Oil Finish is NOT an oil. It's a varnish pure and simple. It's thinned to allow it to be wiped on but it's a varnish.

Being a varnish, I would not "wet sand" it with the Formby's. If you want to do anything to it, you can "wet sand" it with either water or mineral spirits. Be sure you have at least 5-6 coats of finish on or you will risk sanding through the surface. Also,let the varnish fully cure for 3-4 weeks before rubbing out or applying a wax. Rubbing it out will change the sheen sheen so I suggest you test it out on some scrap.

Howie.........
Howie.........
BioHaz1906's picture

(post #111894, reply #16 of 31)

Thanks for the help.  I think I'll rub it out with 600 grit paper and water.  It is basically finished so I'll post it soon for feedback.


Bio

BioHaz1906's picture

(post #111894, reply #17 of 31)

Howie,


I did as you advised and lightly sanded it down with 600 grit wet/dry paper with the surface charged with water.  Looks GREAT.  Attached are a few pictures taken from my phone camera, I don't know how well they will be, but let me know what you think.  Thanks to you and all for the advice.


Bio

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HowardAcheson's picture

(post #111894, reply #18 of 31)

Looks fine to me. If you are happy, declare victory and humbly accept the accolades.

Howie.........

Howie.........
BioHaz1906's picture

(post #111894, reply #19 of 31)

Thanks, I'm really focused on finishing.  I use to have a buddy that I paid GREAT money to finish, and he and I are no longer buddies because of some drama associated with a project so I was forced to learn, and as I look back I regret that I ever spent a penny on it.  Not only would I have saved a bunch of money, I may still have that friend.  I have learned finishing really isnt' bad, I just hate the fact that you have to wait so long to move between steps.  Thanks once again for all the advice.


Bio. 

Cincinnati's picture

(post #111894, reply #9 of 31)

Depends on Relative Humidity in your area. Oil finishes take longer to cure here in the tropical southern US than in states like AZ or CA.

Greg


•••••••


Exo 35:30-35

Greg

•••••••

Exo 35:30-35

hereford's picture

(post #111894, reply #21 of 31)

I wouldn't put AZ in that category right now. It has been raining so much over the last couple weeks that I have mushrooms growing. Weeds are knee high and green.


Back on topic. I have had it with tung oil / varnish finishes. Seems I can't get the hang of wiping it all off enough. The first coat dried fine. The second also. The third coat has been sitting for a week and it is still tacky to touch. I know that each additional coat should take longer but this is bad. I may try again some other day though.


 

HowardAcheson's picture

(post #111894, reply #22 of 31)

What Tung Oil are you using and what varnish? Also, how are you applying it?

Howie.........

Howie.........
WillGeorge's picture

(post #111894, reply #20 of 31)

What Chris said..


I guess I did my project with pure? Tung Oil... Rocklers.. SAID SO on the bottle! Still not fully dry today. However, it has been very humid here in Chicago..


I'm not upset at all! In fact I think it was an advantage.. I have some very pretty figured Jatoba Ply that I ruined using that blue tape to mask gluing. Figured grain came up with the TAPE!


As a last ditch try.. I just oiled it up and wiped dry as you should.. However, I left the damaged parts with a pool of oil.. OK, so not a pool, but wet! After a day of drying. 220 grit sanding.. Collected all the stuff I could from the sandpaper... Scraped it off with one of my many card scrapers. Yes.. Sand and all!... Took the dust (gummy stuff but not that gummy) and put it in the damaged parts. Smoothed it out with a puddy knife.


Waited a day..


Put down a fresh hunk of 120 grit paper. Placed a scraper on top of the sandpaper and gave it a light wack with a 'dead blow hammer' Several times!  Ok so I was a bit ticked off! ..just to set a pattern in there.


I looked this morning! Not to bad!  The pattern in the figured Jatoba (before my stupid blue tape thing) almost looks like Lacewood from.. Australia?


I will know, but if dries OK, nobody else will! I am thinking.. If it is still a 'bit' soft tomorrow.. Light brushing with a brass brush just may make it look original! 


Luckily... That Jatoba is very tough wood.. Even in a veneer!


Luckily... Two.. It is very near the back edge of the top which has a decorative trim (Back and side rest) on the back and the sides. Made to hold a cushion from sliding off.  AND hopefully the child!


Just a fancy Toy box with a seat for her to sit on as she changes her socks. Or maybe even fall asleep on.. She will have to grow ALOT before she can sit on it!

Have a great day.. Life is wonderful even if you are having a bad day!

labolle's picture

(post #111894, reply #27 of 31)

I use pure tung oil over here and have found that putting it in direct sunlight is the difference between it curing or not. 


Put it in the sun and a few hours later she should be good to go.


D.L.

BioHaz1906's picture

(post #111894, reply #28 of 31)

Thanks.

AZMO's picture

(post #111894, reply #29 of 31)

I do the same here in Phoenix, and it cures quick. Two coats a day is easy to do. Buy a batch of white painters rag at Home Repo, and change them alot. Wiping it down to a thin coat is essential.

                  


-----------_o


---------_'\-,>


-------(*)/ (*)   www.EarthArtLandscape.com

SteveSchoene's picture

(post #111894, reply #30 of 31)

A little heat helps speed the cure of any finish, but with tung oil there are reasons to go particularly slow, since generally with normal temps you should wait at least 2-3 days between coats for the cure.  It can feel dry without being cured.  Sometimes, not always, but sometimes if you rush, and don't hold your mouth just right, tung oil can develop a "frosty" appearance, with stripping being the only solution.  This is with pure tung oil, not tung oil "finish".  Besides pure tung oil just doesn't make a very good finish.  It takes 5-6 coats to get an even satin finish, and once you have achieved it, it is only a very small amount more moisture resistant than linseed oil.  In otherwords, minimal protection. 


Using an oil/varnish mix will give you considerably more protection from water spotting and just plain "drying out".  But the look and feel will be virtually indistiquishable.   

Test your finish on scrap, FIRST, or risk having to scrap your finish.

AZMO's picture

(post #111894, reply #31 of 31)

Steve you are correct. The product I use is Tung Oil finish, which has other oils and varnish and is not pure tung oil. Probably just another version of a wiping varnish? Until you have lived here, it is hard to describe how low humidity, warm temps and lots of sun makes things dry. 


If you spray a latex paint here outside and do not keep your nozzle within 12 or 18" max it is dry before it contacts. So I always do finish work early or late, and can get two coats done about 14 to 15 hours apart. Now if I had an airconditioned shop :>) it would be different!!


 


                  


-----------_o


---------_'\-,>


-------(*)/ (*)   www.EarthArtLandscape.com

Madison2's picture

(post #111894, reply #23 of 31)

"How long does it take for tung to cure?


You know, I've never been able to cure mine and it keeps getting me in trouble.  I'll be happily going along and suddenly it starts rambling on and generally gets under someones' skin and then I'm in a real fix.  I sure wish I could find a cure for that :-).


Sorry guys I had to have some fun here!


BioHaz1906, and gosh I do hope that handle doesn't really reflect your being, if you follow the advice of the others who've posted here your tung oil will cure very nicely and applying that wax with a grey abrasive pad will give your work a really sensuous feel when you're done.


Crank up the elbow grease and get to it man!


Madison

BioHaz1906's picture

(post #111894, reply #24 of 31)

Thanks for the post!

Don01's picture

(post #111894, reply #25 of 31)

Bio,
If you want an interesting read on varnishing, look at FWW 168 David Sorg writes a good article on taking a varnished finish to the top.

http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesPDF.aspx?id=2893

Don