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finish for aspen ceiling

royboy's picture

Last week I installed a 600 sf wood ceiling in a storefront my wife and I own. Random width aspen paneling. We are remodelling the whole space and the ceiling is the first finish surface installed. Wanting to seal the ceiling, so it can be cleaned if needed. Our desire is to put some sealer/finish on that minimally changes the appearance (color & sheen) of the raw wood, which looks great. As well as requiring minimal effort to apply (if we can avoid sanding I'd be a very happy camper).

Would appreciate anyone's thoughts on good products/techniques.

Thanks!

Tao's picture

(post #107632, reply #1 of 5)

Given the situation and requirements you describe. I'd spray or pad on a WB lacquer.  Minimal darkening, easy to apply.  I would scuff sand between coats, but that's a pretty quick process,


Michael R

Michael

royboy's picture

(post #107632, reply #2 of 5)

WWiz - can you elaborate on why lacquer as opposed to polyurethane? Others have been recommending poly and you are the first to mention lacquer.

Thanks - Roy

Tao's picture

(post #107632, reply #3 of 5)

Lack of color change, ease of application, and drying time.


WB lacquer isn't actually a lacquer, but it behaves more or less like one.  It dries fast and can be sprayed, or applied with a painting pad. It's not relevant to this job, but most WB polys contain acrylic and urethane resins and are pretty wear-resistant, but their chemical resistance is a little low.  In your situation, appearance and ease of application would seem most important.


Oil based poly would be the last finish I would choose.  It will darken and amber the apppearance of your wood.  It dries slow and is a lot of work to apply.  To me, most oil based polys look bad.  It's generally the last finish I would choose for anything, actually, although there are a couple of scenarios where I might use it.


Michael R

Michael

royboy's picture

(post #107632, reply #4 of 5)

thank you Michael - the other recommendations I've had were for WB polys. any particular varieties of WB lacquers that you have found good (or bad)?

Roy

Tao's picture

(post #107632, reply #5 of 5)

Honestly, the only one I have ever used is Ultrastar by M L Campbell.  The kind of work I do requires that I pretty much stick to solvent based finishes or that I duplicate antique finishes.  Ultrastar is certainly OK for this application, but there are plenty on the market that will work just fine.


Michael R

Michael